Etymology
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naturalness (n.)

early 15c., "normality," from natural (adj.) + -ness. From 1650s as "state of being natural," also "conformity to nature; absence of artificiality, exaggeration, or affectation."

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inclination (n.)

late 14c., inclinacioun, "condition of being mentally disposed" (to do something), "natural disposition due to a humor or the influence of planets at one's birth," from Old French inclination (14c.) and directly from Latin inclinationem (nominative inclinatio) "a leaning, bending," figuratively "tendency, bias, favor," noun of action from past-participle stem of inclinare "to bend, turn; cause to lean" (see incline (v.)). Meaning "action of bending toward" (something) is from early 15c. That of "amount of a slope" is from 1799.

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naif (adj.)

"ingenuous, artless, natural," 1590s, from French naïf, literally "naive" (see naive). The masculine form of the French word, but used in English without reference to gender. As a noun, "natural, artless, naive person," first attested 1893, from French, where Old French naif also meant "native inhabitant; simpleton, natural fool."

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unkindly (adj.)
early 13c., "not natural, unnatural," from un- (1) "not" + kindly (adj.). From c. 1300 as "without natural affection, unfraternally." Old English had ungecyndelic.
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physico- 

word-forming element meaning "physical, physically; natural," from Latinized form of Greek physikos "natural, physical, pertaining to nature" (from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow"). Compare physic.

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physics (n.)

1580s, "natural science, the science of the principles operative in organic nature," from physic in sense of "natural science." Also see -ics. Based on Latin physica (neuter plural), from Greek ta physika, literally "the natural things," title of Aristotle's treatise on nature. The current restricted sense of "science treating of properties of matter and energy" is from 1715.

Before the rise of modern science, physics was usually defined as the science of that which is movable, or the science of natural bodies. It was commonly made to include all natural science. At present, vital phenomena are not considered objects of physics, which is divided into general and applied physics. [Century Dictionary, 1895]
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ta 
1772, "natural infantile sound of gratitude" [Weekley].
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naive (adj.)

1650s, "natural, simple, unsophisticated, artless," from French naïve, fem. of naïf, from Old French naif "naive, natural, genuine; just born; foolish, innocent; unspoiled, unworked" (13c.), from Latin nativus "not artificial," also "native, rustic," literally "born, innate, natural" (see native (adj.)). In philosophy, "unreflecting, uncritical" (1895), used of non-philosophers. Related: Naively.

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process (n.)

early 14c., proces, "fact of being carried on" (as in in process), from Old French proces "a journey; continuation, development; legal trial" (13c.) and directly from Latin processus "a going forward, advance, progress," from past-participle stem of procedere "go forward" (see proceed).

Meaning "course or method of action, continuous action or series of actions or events" is from mid-14c.; sense of "continuous and regular series of actions meant to accomplish some result" (the main modern sense) is from 1620s. Meaning "a projection from the main body of something," especially a natural appendage, is from 1570s. Legal sense of "course of action of a suit at law, the whole of the proceedings in any action at law" is attested from early 14c.; hence due process "fair treatment" at law, considered as a right (mid-15c.).

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divination (n.)

late 14c., divinacioun, "act of foretelling by supernatural or magical means the future, or discovering what is hidden or obscure," from Old French divination (13c.), from Latin divinationem (nominative divinatio) "the power of foreseeing, prediction," noun of action from past-participle stem of divinare, literally "to be inspired by a god," from divinus "of a god," from divus "a god," related to deus "god, deity" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god"). Related: Divinatory.

Divination hath been anciently and fitly divided into artificial and natural; whereof artificial is when the mind maketh a prediction by argument, concluding upon signs and tokens: natural is when the mind hath a presention by an internal power, without the inducement of a sign. [Francis Bacon, "The Advancement of Learning," 1605]
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