Etymology
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Kickapoo 

Native American people of the Algonquian family, 1722, from native /kiikaapoa/ which is sometimes interpreted as "wanderers" [Bright].

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Guarani (n.)

South American Indian language, 1797, from a native word.

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sun-dance (n.)

Native American ceremony, 1849, from sun (n.) + dance (n.).

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Angeleno (n.)

"resident or native of Los Angeles," 1888, from American Spanish Angeleño, from (Los) Angeles + -eño, suffix indicating a native or resident. See Los Angeles.

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Mojave 

Native American people of Yuman stock living along the Colorado River, also Mohave, 1831, from native (Yuman) name, hamakhaav, perhaps containing aha "water."

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anole (n.)

or anoli, type of American lizard, 1906, from a native name in the Antilles.

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Natchez 

Native American people of the lower Mississippi valley, 1775, a name of unknown origin.

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condor (n.)

"large, South American bird of prey," c. 1600, from American Spanish, from Quechua (Inca) cuntur, the native name for the bird.

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capybara (n.)

also capibara, large South American rodent, 1774, from the Tupi (Brazilian) native name.

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gaucho (n.)

"a Spanish-descended native of the pampas," 1824, guacho, from Spanish gaucho, probably from a native South American language. Compare Araucanian (native language spoken in part of Chile) cauchu "wanderer." Noted for their independence and skill in horsemanship and with the lasso.

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