Etymology
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profoundness (n.)

early 15c., profoundnesse,  "inner part of the body;" mid-15c. as "the bottom of the sea;" late 15c. as "depth of meaning, mystery;" from profound + -ness.

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deepness (n.)

Old English deopnes "deep water," also "a mystery or secret;" see deep (adj.) + -ness. From late 12c. as "distance downward;" c. 1200 as "wisdom, profundity."

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biblioklept (n.)
"one who steals books," 1880, from biblio- "book" + Greek kleptes "thief" (see kleptomania). Walsh calls it "a modern euphemism which softens the ugly word book-thief by shrouding it in the mystery of the Greek language."
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apiary (n.)

1650s, from Latin apiarium "bee-house, beehive," noun use of neuter of apiarius "of bees," from apis "bee," a mystery word unrelated to any similar words in other Indo-European languages. A borrowing from Semitic has been proposed. Related: Apiarian (1798).

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denouement (n.)

"the solution of a mystery, the winding up of a plot, the outcome of a course of conduct," 1752, from French dénouement "an untying" (of plot), from dénouer "untie" (Old French desnouer) from des- "un-, out" (see dis-) + nouer "to tie, knot," from Latin nodus "a knot," from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie."

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profundity (n.)

early 15c., "bottom of the sea," from Old French profundite (Modern French profondité) and directly from Late Latin profunditatem (nominative profunditas) "depth, intensity, immensity," from profundus "deep, vast" (see profound). Meaning "depth of intellect, feeling, or spiritual mystery" in English is from c. 1500.

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arcana (n.)
"hidden things, mysteries," 1590s, a direct adoption of the Latin plural of arcanum "a secret, a mystery," an important word in alchemy, from neuter of adjective arcanus "secret, hidden, private, concealed" (see arcane). Occasionally mistaken for a singular and pluralized as arcanas, because arcana is far more common than arcanum.
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privacy (n.)

1590s, "a private or personal matter, a secret;" c. 1600 as "seclusion, state of being in retirement from company or the knowledge and observation of others," from private (adj.) + abstract noun suffix -cy. Meaning "state of freedom from intrusion or interference" is from 1814. Earlier was privatie (late 14c. as "secret, mystery;" c. 1400 as "a secret, secret deed; solitude, privacy"), from Old French privauté.

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Babylon 

mid-14c., representing the Greek rendition of Akkadian Bab-ilani "the gate of the gods," from bab "gate" + ilani, plural of ilu "god" (compare Babel). The Old Persian form, Babiru-, shows characteristic transformation of -l- to -r- in words assimilated from Semitic. Formerly also applied by Protestants to the Church in Rome, from the woman "arrayed in purple and scarlet" in Revelation xvii.5 ("And upon her forehead was a name written, Mystery, Babylon the Great, the mother of harlots and abominations of the earth").

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interlude (n.)

formerly also enterlude, c. 1300, from Old French entrelude and directly from Medieval Latin interludium "an interlude," from Latin inter "between" (see inter-) + ludus "a play" (see ludicrous). Originally the term for farcical episodes ("generally short and coarse" - Century Dictionary) drawn from real life introduced between acts of long mystery or morality plays. In 17c.-18c. it meant "popular stage play;" transferred (non-dramatic) sense of "interval in the course of some action" is from 1751. Related: Interludial.

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