Etymology
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chorale (n.)

1828, "sacred choral song; musical composition in harmony, suited for performance by a choir," from German Choral "metrical hymn in Reformed church," shortened from Choralgesang "choral song," translating Medieval Latin cantus choralis, from Latin choralis "belonging to a chorus or choir," from chorus (see chorus). The -e was added to indicate stress. Meaning "group of singers performing choral music" is from 1942.

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ensemble (n.)
1703, "union of parts, parts of a thing taken together," from French ensemblée "all the parts of a thing considered together," from Late Latin insimul "at the same time," from in- intensive prefix + simul "at the same time," related to similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar). Musical sense of "union of all parts in a performance" in English first attested 1844. Of women's dress and accessories, from 1927. Earlier in English as an adverb (mid-15c.), "together, at the same time."
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serenade (n.)

1640s, "a musical performance at night in open air" (especially "one given by a lover under the window of his lady" [OED]), from French sérénade (16c.), from Italian serenata "an evening song," literally "calm sky," from sereno "the open air," noun use of sereno "clear, calm," from Latin serenus "peaceful, calm, serene" (see serene (adj.)). The sense was influenced by Italian sera "evening" (from Latin sera, fem. of serus "late"). The meaning "piece of instrumental music suitable for a serenade" is attested from 1728.

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acting (n.)
c. 1600, "performance of deeds;" 1660s, "performance of plays;" verbal noun from present participle of act (v.). Acting out "abnormal behavior caused by unconscious influences" is from 1945 in psychiatry.
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minor (n.)

early 14c., Menour, "a Franciscan," from Latin Fratres Minores "lesser brethren," name chosen by the order's founder, St. Francis, for the sake of humility; see minor (adj.). From c. 1400 as "minor premise of a syllogism." From 1610s as "person of either sex who is under legal age for the performance of certain acts" (Latin used minores (plural) for "the young"). Musical sense is from 1797 (see the adjective). Academic meaning "secondary subject of study, subject of study with fewer credits than a major" is from 1890; as a verb in this sense by 1905.

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officeship (n.)

early 15c., "performance of ecclesiastical duties," from office + -ship.

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musicality (n.)

"character of being musical," 1812, from musical (adj.) + -ity.

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MIDI 

"device for connecting computers and electronic musical instruments," 1983, acronym for Musical Instrument Digital Interface.

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tonic (n.2)
in the musical sense, 1760, short for tonic note, from tone (n.) in the musical sense + -ic. Related: Tonicity.
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orchestral (adj.)

"pertaining to an orchestra; suitable for performance by an orchestra," 1811, from orchestra + -al (1).

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