Etymology
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booger (n.)
"nasal mucus," by 1890s; earlier bugger. Also boogie.
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loogie (n.)
"nasal mucus," U.S. slang, by 1990.
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urschleim (n.)
1921, from German Urschleim "original mucus," from ur- (see ur-) + Schleim (see slime (n.)).
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expectoration (n.)

"act of discharging phlegm or mucus from the throat or lungs by coughing or hawking and spitting," 1670s, noun of action from expectorate.

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mucose (adj.)

"mucous, slimy, covered with mucus," 1731, from Latin mucosus (see mucous). Related: Mucosity (1680s).

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pip (n.2)

"disease of poultry consisting of a secretion of thick mucus which forms a white scale around the tongue," late 14c., pippe, probably from Middle Dutch pippe "mucus," from West Germanic *pipit (source also of East Frisian pip, Middle High German pfipfiz, German Pips), an early borrowing from Vulgar Latin *pippita, an unexplained alteration of Latin pituita "phlegm" (see pituitary).

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coryza (n.)

"acute inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, etc., a head-cold," 1630s, medical Latin, from Latinized form of Greek koryza "running at the nose," which is of uncertain etymology. It is traditionally compared to Germanic words for "mucus," such as Old English hrot, Old High German (h)roz "mucus" which are verbal nouns from Old English hrutan, Old High German hruzzan "to grumble, snore."

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snuffle (n.)
1764, "sound made by snuffling," from snuffle (v.). Old English had snofl (n.) "phlegm, mucus." The snuffles "troublesome mucous discharge from the nostrils" is from 1770.
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glair (n.)
white of an egg (used as a varnish), c. 1300, from Old French glaire "white of egg, slime, mucus" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *claria (ovi) "white part (of an egg)," from Latin clarus "bright, clear" (see clear (adj.)). Related: Glaireous.
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hore (n.)
"dirt, filth," also hor; from Old English horh "phlegm, mucus," horu "foulness, dirt, defilement," from Proto-Germanic *horwo- (source also of Old Frisian hore, Old High German horo, Old Norse horr), perhaps imitative of coughing up phlegm.
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