Etymology
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kino- 

before vowels, kin-, word-forming element in use from late 19c. and meaning "motion," from Greek kino-, from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion").

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kinesis (n.)

"physical movement, muscular action," 1819, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move," from PIE *kie-neu-, suffixed form of root *keie- "set in motion."

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kinesics (n.)

study of body language, 1952, from Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + -ics. Related: kinesic.

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car-sick (adj.)
also carsick, "dizzy and nauseated from the motion of an automobile," 1908, from car (n.) + sick (adj.). Earlier it was used in the sense of "sick from the motion of a railroad car." Related: Car-sickness.
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telekinesis (n.)

1890, said in early references to have been coined by Alexander N. Aksakof (1832-1903) Imperial Councilor to the Czar, in Modern Latin, literally "motion at a distance," from tele- + Greek kinēsis "movement, motion," from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion." Translates German Fernwirkung. Related: Telekinetic.

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twirl (n.)
1590s, "rapid circular motion," from twirl (v.).
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aerodynamics (n.)
"science of the motion of air or other gases," 1837, from aero- "air" + dynamics.
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kinetic (adj.)

"relating to muscular motion," 1841, from Greek kinetikos "moving, putting in motion," from kinetos "moved," verbal adjective of kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion").

Buster Keaton's subject was kinetic man, a being he approached with the almost metaphysical awe we reserve for a Doppelgänger. This being was, eerily, himself, played by himself, then later in a projection room, watched by himself: an experience never possible to any generation of actors in the previous history of the world. [Hugh Kenner, "The Counterfeiters," 1968]

From 1855 as "causing motion." Related: Kinetical; kinetically.

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reel (n.3)

"a staggering motion," 1570s, from reel (v.1).

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sensorimotor (adj.)

"pertaining to sensation and to motion," 1855, from combining form of sensory + motor (n.).

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