Etymology
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upfront (adj.)
1932, up front "in the front," from up + front (n.). Meaning "honest, open" is from 1970; that of "paid in advance" is from 1967.
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frontal (adj.)
"being in front," 1650s, of the forehead; 1971 with reference to the naked standing body; from Modern Latin frontalis, from front-, stem of Latin frons "brow, forehead" (see front (n.)). In some uses probably from front (n.) + adjectival suffix -al (1).
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anterior (adj.)
"more in front; earlier," 1610s, Latin, literally "former," comparative of ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before"). Related: Anteriorly (1590s); anteriority.
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frontlet (n.)
"headband," late 15c., from Old French frontelet, diminutive of frontel "forehead, front of a helmet, hairband" (Modern French fronteau), from Late Latin frontale "an ornament for the forehead," from frons "forehead; front" (see front (n.)).
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beachfront (adj.)
also beach-front, 1903, American English, from beach (n.) + front (n.). The beach front was a standard way in late 19c. to express "the seashore of a town" such as Atlantic City.
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forefront (n.)
"front part," late 15c., a Germanic-Latin hybrid, from fore- + front (n.). Originally of buildings, later of battles. The main modern sense ("foremost place in some scene of action") is from the military meaning "front rank of an army" (1510s).
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avant 
French, literally "before," in various terms borrowed into English; cognate with Italian avanti, both from Late Latin abante, a compound of ab "from" (see ab-) and ante "before, in front of" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") which meant "from in front of," but in Vulgar Latin came to mean simply "before."
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pinafore (n.)

1782, "sleeveless apron worn by children," originally to protect the front of the dress, from pin (v.) + afore "on the front." So called because it was originally pinned to a dress front. Later a fashion garment for women (c. 1900).

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ante- 
word-forming element meaning "before, in front of; previous, existing beforehand; introductory to," from Latin ante (prep., adv.) "before (in place or time), in front of, against," also used in compounds, from PIE *anti- "facing opposite, against," inflected form (locative singular) of root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before."
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forward (adv.)
Old English forewearde "toward the front, in front; toward the future; at the beginning;" see fore + -ward. Adjectival sense of "early" is from 1520s; that of "presumptuous" is attested from 1560s. The Old English adjective meant "inclined to the front; early; former."
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