Etymology
Advertisement
moonrace (n.)
also moon race, "national rivalry to be first to send humans to the moon," 1963, from moon (n.) + race (n.1).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
moonwalk (n.)

1966, "a walking on the moon," from moon (n.) + walk (n.). As a dance move in which the dancer  moves backward while appearing to walk forward it was popularized 1983 by Michael Jackson. 

Related entries & more 
moonlit (adj.)

also moon-lit, "lighted or illuminated by the moon," 1819, from moon (n.) + lit (adj.).

Related entries & more 
moon-dial (n.)

"dial for showing the hours by the light of the moon," 1680s, from moon (n.) + dial (n.).

Related entries & more 
moorings (n.)

1744, "ropes, etc., by which a floating thing is confined or made fast," from mooring. Figurative sense of "that to which anything is fastened or by which it is held" is by 1851.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
moonscape (n.)

"the landscape of the moon or a surface resembling it," 1926, from moon (n.) + scape (n.1).

Related entries & more 
moon-up (n.)

"moonrise," U.S. dialectal, 1907, from moon (n.) probably based on sun-up (q.v.).

Related entries & more 
moon-shot (n.)

"launching of a spacecraft toward the moon," 1958, from moon (n.) + shot (n.).

Related entries & more 
moonbeam (n.)

"ray of light from the moon," 1580s, from moon (n.) + beam (n.).

Related entries & more 
moot (adj.)

"debatable, subject to discussion," by 1650s, from moot case (1570s), earlier simply moot (n.) in the specialized sense "discussion of a hypothetical law case" (1530s) in law student jargon. The reference is to students gathering to test their skills in mock cases.

Related entries & more 

Page 2