Etymology
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fog (n.2)
"long grass, second growth of grass after mowing," late 14c., probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Norwegian fogg "long grass in a moist hollow," Icelandic fuki "rotten sea grass." A connection to fog (n.1) via a notion of long grass growing in moist dells of northern Europe is tempting but not proven. Watkins suggests derivation from PIE *pu- (2) "to rot, decay" (see foul (adj.)).
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hygroscope (n.)
"device which indicates atmospheric humidity," 1660s, from hygro- "wet, moist; moisture" + -scope. It indicates the presence of moisture but not the amount (which is measured by a hygrometer). Related: Hygroscopic.
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flag (n.3)
plant growing in moist places, late 14c., "reed, rush," perhaps from Scandinavian (compare Danish flæg "yellow iris") or from Dutch flag; perhaps ultimately connected to flag (v.1) on notion of "fluttering in the breeze."
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fluid (adj.)

early 15c., "liquid, capable of flowing," from Old French fluide (14c.) and directly from Latin fluidus "fluid, flowing, moist," from fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Figurative use, of non-material things, "not fixed or rigid," from 1640s. Related: Fluidly.

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oozy (adj.)

Old English wosig "juicy, moist;" see ooze (v.) + -y (2). Original sense now obsolete; meaning "containing or resembling fine soft mud; having the consistency of wet mud or slime" is from 1560s. Related: Ooziness.

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al fresco (adv.)
also alfresco, 1753, Italian, literally "in the fresh (air)." Italian al represents a contraction of words from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + ille "that" (see le). Alfresco also meant "painted on plaster that was still fresh or moist" (1764; see fresco).
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must (n.3)

"male elephant frenzy," 1878, from earlier adjective (1855), from Urdu mast "intoxicated, in rut," from Persian mast, literally "intoxicated," related to Sanskrit matta- "drunk, intoxicated," past participle of madati "boils, bubbles, gets drunk," from PIE root *mad- "wet, moist" (see mast (n.2)).

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ombro- 

word-forming element meaning "rain, rainfall; excessive moisture," from Greek ombros "shower of rain," from PIE *ombh-ro- "rain" (source also of Sanskrit abhra "cloud, thunder-cloud, rainy weather," Latin imber "rain, heavy rain; rainwater"), from root *nebh- "moist; water" (see nebula). 

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mynah (n.)

also mina, name given to various passerine birds of India and the East, 1769, from Hindi maina "a starling," from Sanskrit madana- "delightful, joyful," related to madati "it gladdens," literally "it bubbles," perhaps from PIE root *mad- "moist, wet" (see mast (n.2)). The "talking starling" of India is Eulabes religiosa.

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humidity (n.)
late 14c., "state or quality of being humid," from Old French humidité, umidité "dampness, humidity," from Latin humiditatem (nominative humiditas), from humidus "moist, wet" (see humid). In meteorology, "a measure of moisture in the air compared with the amount required to saturate it under current conditions (relative humidity), from 1820.
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