Etymology
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olde 

pseudo-archaic mock-antique variant of old, by 1883.

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boxiana (n.)
"the lore and annals of prize-fighting," by 1819, mock-Latin, from box (v.2).
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crankum (n.)

"a 'twist,' an eccentricity," 1822, mock-Latin formation from crank (n.) in the secondary sense.

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scoptic (adj.)

1660s, "mocking, scoffing," from Latinized form of Greek skoptikos "given to mockery," from skoptein "to mock, jest."

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circumbendibus (n.)

"a roundabout way or process, a circumlocution," 1680s, a mock-Latin formation from circum- + bend (n.).

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cavil (v.)

"to raise frivolous objections, find fault without good reason," 1540s, from French caviller "to mock, jest," from Latin cavillari "to jeer, mock; satirize, argue scoffingly" (also source of Italian cavillare, Spanish cavilar), from cavilla "jest, jeering," which is related to calumnia "slander, false accusation" (see calumny). Related: Caviller, cavilling.

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buffo (n.)

1764, "comic actor in an opera," from Italian buffo "a comic actor," from buffare "to mock; to puff" (see buffoon).

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gab (v.)
"talk much," 1786, probably via Scottish and northern England dialect from earlier sense "speak foolishly; talk indiscreetly" (late 14c.), from gabben "to scoff, jeer; mock (someone), ridicule; reproach (oneself)," also "to lie to" (late 13c.), from a Scandinavian source, such as Old Norse gabba "to mock, make fun of," and probably in part from Old French gaber "to mock, jest; brag, boast," which, too, is from Scandinavian. Ultimately perhaps imitative (compare gabble, which might have shaded the sense of this word). Gabber was Middle English for "liar, deceiver; mocker." Related: Gabbed; gabbing.
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delusory (adj.)

late 15c., "false, deceitful," from Latin delusor "a deceiver," from stem of deludere "to play false, mock, deceive" (see delude).

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crinkum-crankum (n.)

1761, "winding or crooked line; anything full of twists and turns," mock Latin based on crank, etc.

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