Etymology
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intermit (v.)
1540s, "to interrupt" (obsolete); 1570s as "to discontinue for a time, suspend" (trans.) and "cease for a time" (intrans.), from Latin intermittere "to leave off, leave an interval, omit, suspend, interrupt, neglect," from inter "between" (see inter-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Related: Intermitted; intermitting.
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pretermit (v.)

1510s, "neglect to do, leave undone," from Latin praetermittere "let pass, overlook," from praeter- (see preter-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission). From 1530s as "intentionally omit, leave unnoticed or unmentioned." Related: Pretermitted; pretermitting.

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demission (n.)

"act of putting away or letting go, a giving up or laying down," 1570s, from French démission, from Latin demissionem "a sending away," noun of action from past-participle stem of demittere, literally "to send down," from de "down" (see de-) + mittere "to let go, send, release" (see mission).

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omit (v.)
Origin and meaning of omit

early 15c., omitten, "fail to use or do, fail or neglect to mention or speak of, to disregard," from Latin omittere "let go, let fall," figuratively "lay aside, disregard," from assimilated form of ob (here perhaps intensive) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Related: Omitted; omitting.

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surmise (v.)
c. 1400, in law, "to charge, allege," from Old French surmis, past participle of surmettre "to accuse," from sur- "upon" (see sur- (1)) + mettre "put," from Latin mittere "to send" (see mission). Meaning "to infer conjecturally" is recorded from 1700, from the noun. Related: Surmised; surmising.
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permit (v.)

early 15c., permitten, transitive, "allow (something) to be done, suffer or allow to be," from Old French permetre and directly from Latin permittere "let pass, let go, let loose; give up, hand over; let, allow, grant, permit," from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Meaning "grant liberty or leave" is from 16c. Related: Permitted; permitting.

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admit (v.)
late 14c., "let in," from Latin admittere "admit, give entrance, allow to enter; grant an audience," of acts, "let be done, allow, permit," from ad "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Sense of "to concede in argument as valid or true" is first recorded early 15c. In Middle English sometimes also amit, after Old French amettre, which was refashioned 15c. Related: Admitted; Admitting.
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admission (n.)
Origin and meaning of admission

early 15c., "acceptance, reception, approval," from Latin admissionem (nominative admissio) "a letting in," noun of action from past-participle stem of admittere "admit, give entrance; grant an audience," of acts, "let be done, allow, permit," from ad "to" (see ad-) + mittere "let go, send" (see mission). Meaning "an acknowledging" is from 1530s. Literal sense of "act of allowing to enter, admittance," is from 1620s. As short for admission price, by 1792.

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remit (v.)

late 14c., remitten, "to forgive, pardon," from Latin remittere "send back, slacken, let go back, abate," from re- "back" (see re-) + mittere "to send" (see mission). Secondary senses predominate in English.

From c. 1400 as "refer for consideration or performance from one person or group to another;" early 15c. as "send to prison or back to prison." The meaning "allow to remain unpaid, refrain from exacting" (penalty, punishment, etc.) is from mid-15c. Meaning "send money (to someone) in payment" is recorded from 1630s. Related: Remitted; remitting.

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manumit (v.)

early 15c., manumitten, "set (a slave or captive) free," from Latin manumittere "to release from one's power, set at liberty, emancipate," literally "to send from one's 'hand'" (i.e. "control"), from the phrase manu mittere "release from control," from manu, ablative of manus "power of a master," literally "hand" (from PIE root *man- (2) "hand") + mittere "let go, release" (see mission). Related: Manumitted; manumitting. Alternative form manumiss, manumise was sometimes used 16c.-19c.

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