Etymology
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mill-dam (n.)

"dam to check the flow of a stream and create a fall to furnish power for turning a mill-wheel," 12c., mulnedam; see mill (n.1) + dam (n.).

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run-of-the-mill (adj.)

"ordinary, unspectacular," 1922, a figurative use of a commercial phrase attested by 1909 in reference to material yielded by a mill (n.1), etc., before sorting for quality (compare common run "usual, ordinary type," from 1712). From run (n.) on the notion of "a continuous stretch of grinding."

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millwright (n.)

"engineer who designs and builds mills and their machinery," late 15c., from mill (n.1) + wright.

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millwork (n.)

also mill-work, "machinery used in mills or manufacturies," 1770, from mill (n.1) + work (n.).

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milling (n.)

mid-15c., "act or business of grinding (grain) in a mill," verbal noun from mill (v.1). In reference to shaping metals by 1610s; in coin-making by 1817.

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millage (n.)

"rate of (real estate) taxation in mills per dollar of assessed value," 1871, U.S., from mill (n.2) + -age.

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millstream (n.)

"a mill-race, a current of water that drives a mill-wheel," Old English mylestream; see mill (n.1) + stream (n.).

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sawmill (n.)

"mill (originally driven by water or wind) for sawing timber into boards and planks," 1550s; see saw (n.1) + mill (n.1).

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miller (n.)

"one who grinds grain in a mill," mid-14c. (as a surname by early 14c.), agent noun from mill (v.1). In Middle English both with and without the -n-. The Old English word was mylnweard, literally "mill-keeper" (preserved in surname Millward, which is attested from late 13c.).

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millstone (n.)

"one of a pair of cylindrical stones used in a mill for grinding grain," Middle English millestone, milne-ston, mullestone, from Old English mylenstan, from mill (n.1) + stone (n.). Compare Dutch molensteen, German Mühlstein, Danish møllesten. Figurative sense of "a burden" (1787) is from Matthew xviii.6.

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