Etymology
Advertisement
midstream (n.)

also mid-stream, "the middle of the stream," Old English midstream; see mid (adj.) + stream (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
midst (n.)

"the middle; an interior or central part, point, or position," c. 1400, from Middle English middes (mid-14c.), from mid (adj.) + adverbial genitive -s. The unetymological -t is perhaps on model of superlatives (compare against).

Related entries & more 
midwife (n.)

"a woman who assists women in childbirth," c. 1300, literally "woman who is 'with' " (the mother at birth), from Middle English mid "with" (see mid (prep.)) + wif "woman" (see wife). Cognate with German Beifrau.

Related entries & more 
midlife (n.)

also mid-life, 1837, from mid (adj.) + life. Middle-life is from early 14c. Midlife crisis "transition of identity and self-confidence that can occur in middle-aged individuals" is attested by 1965 (crisis of mid-life is by 1963).

Related entries & more 
midland (adj.)

early 15c., mydlonde, "in the interior of a country," from mid (adj.) + land (n.). As a noun from 1550s; especially of the inland central part of England. The earlier noun form was middel lond (c. 1300). Related: Midlands.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
midwinter (n.)

also mid-winter, "the middle or depth of winter," Old English midwinter, also midde winter; see mid (adj.) + winter (n.). The middle of winter, traditionally the period around the winter solstice (Dec. 21, winter being reckoned from the first of November). As an adjective from mid-12c.

Related entries & more 
midnight (n.)

"the middle of the night, 12 o'clock at night," Old English mid-niht, or middre niht (with dative of adjective). See mid (adj.) + night. Compare similar formation in Old High German mittinaht, German Mitternacht. Midnight oil symbolizing "late night work" is attested from 1630s.

Related entries & more 
midterm (adj.)

also mid-term, "in the middle of a term" in any sense, from mid (adj.) + term (n.). By 1879 in reference to gestation; 1888 of college semesters (midterm examination is by 1900; student slang shortening midterms for these is by 1903). By 1891 in reference to U.S. congressional elections held in the middle of a four-year presidential term.

Related entries & more 
midday (n.)

also mid-day, "the middle of the day," from Old English middæg "midday, noon," contracted from midne dæg; see mid (adj.) + day. Similar formation in Old Frisian middei, Dutch middag, Old High German mittitag, German Mittag, Old Norse miðdagr. As an adjective, "of or pertaining to midday," from early 14c.

Related entries & more 
midway (n.)

Old English mid-weg "the middle of a way or distance;" see mid (adj.) + way (n.). Meaning "central avenue of a fairground" is first recorded 1893, American English, in reference to the Midway Plaisance of the Worlds Columbian Exposition held that year in Chicago. The Pacific island group is so called for being midway between America and Asia. The great naval battle there was fought June 4-7, 1942. As an adverb from late Old English.

Related entries & more 

Page 2