Etymology
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sirocco (n.)
"hot wind blowing from the Libyan deserts," 1610s, from Italian sirocco, from vulgar Arabic shoruq "the east wind," from Arabic sharqi "eastern, east wind," from sharq "east," from sharaqa "to rise" (in reference to the sun).
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Mideast (n.)

"Middle East," attested from 1944 in reference to western Asia. Loosely defined (compare Middle East).

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Oriental (n.)

"native or inhabitant of the east," 1701, from oriental (adj.). Probably a new use; Middle English had Oriental "a native of the Orient" (late 15c.), also "a resident of the eastern parts of England" (mid-15c.).

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northeast (n.)

also north-east, "point or direction midway between north and east," Old English norþ-east; see north + east. As an adjective, "pertaining to or proceeding from or toward the northeast," by 1739. Related: Northeastern "pertaining to or in the direction of the northeast" (late 14c.); northeastward (1550s); northeasterly (1743).

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Indonesia 

"the East Indies," 1850, from Indo- "India" + Greek nēsos "island" (see Chersonese) + -ia. Formerly called Indian Archipelago or East Indies Islands (see Indies). Related: Indonesian "of or from the East Indies" (1850).

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Ostmark (n.)

name used in the West for the currency of the former German Democratic Republic (East Germany), 1948, from German Ost "east" (see east) + Mark, name of a unit of currency (see mark (n.2)).

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Timor 
island in the East Indies, Malay (Austronesian) timur "east" (in reference to Java and Sumatra). Related: Timorese.
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eastern (adj.)
Old English easterne "of the east, from the east; oriental; of the Eastern Orthodox Church; of the eastern part of the globe," from east + -erne, suffix denoting direction. Cognate with Old Saxon ostroni, Old High German ostroni, Old Norse austroenn. Eastern Shore of Maryland and Virginia so called from 1620s.
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oriental (adj.)

late 14c., "of the orient; from the east," from Old French oriental "eastern, from the east" (12c.) and directly from Latin orientalis "of or belonging to the east," from orientem (see orient (n.)). Originally in reference to the sky, geographical sense, often with a capital O-, is attested from late 15c.; oriental carpet is recorded by 1828. Of gems or stones, "of superior quality," late 14c.

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gamelan (n.)
"East Indian orchestra," 1817, from Javanese gamel "to handle."
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