Etymology
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scrap-yard (n.)

also scrapyard, "place where metal or metal machinery is taken for scrap," 1875, from scrap (n.1) + yard (n.1).

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alloy (n.)
early 14c. "relative freedom of a noble metal from alloy or other impurities," from Anglo-French alai, Old French aloi "alloy," from aloiier (see alloy (v.)). Meaning " base metal alloyed with a noble metal" is from c. 1400. Modern spelling from late 17c. Meaning "any mixture of metals," without reference to values is from 1827.
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sprue (n.)
"piece of metal (later plastic) attached to a cast object," 1875, earlier (1849) "channel through which metal is poured into a mold;" of unknown origin.
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plating (n.)

1825, "the art or operation of covering articles with a thin coating or film of metal;" 1833, "thin coating of one metal laid upon another," verbal noun from plate (v.).

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ingot (n.)
late 14c., "mold in which metal is cast," probably from in- (2) "in" + Old English goten, past participle of geotan "to pour" (from PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). Sense of "mass of cast metal" first attested early 15c.
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casting (n.)

c. 1300, "a throwing," verbal noun from cast (v.). From early 15c. as "the casting of metal, the act or process of founding;" 1788 as "a metal casting, that which has been formed by running molten metal into a mold of a desired form."  Theatrical sense is from 1814. Casting couch "divan in a Hollywood casting directors office," with suggestion of sexual favors in exchange for a role in a picture is by 1948.

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snips (n.)
"small, stout-handled shears for metal-working," 1846, from snip (v.).
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lame (n.)
also lamé, "silk interwoven with metallic threads," 1918, from a specialized sense of French lame, which generally meant "thin metal plate (especially in armor), gold wire; blade; wave (of the sea)," from Old French lame "thin strip, panel, blade, sheet, slice" (13c.), from Latin lamina, lamna "thin piece or flake of metal" (see laminate (v.)). The same French word was used in English earlier in armory as "a plate of metal" (1580s).
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electrotype (n.)
"copy in metal made by electric action," 1840, from electro- + type (n.).
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plate (v.)

"to cover (something) with a layer of metal or mail," late 14c., platen, from plate (n.). Related: Plated.

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