Etymology
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exhilarate (v.)

"to make cheerful, lively, or merry; render glad or joyous," 1530s, from Latin exhilaratus "cheerful, merry," past participle of exhilarare "gladden, cheer," from ex "out, out of; thoroughly" (see ex-) + hilarare "make cheerful," from hilarus "cheerful" (see hilarity). Related: Exhilarated; exhilarating.

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reveler (n.)

also reveller, late 14c., revelour, "one who indulges in revels, one who takes part in merry-making," hence also "one who leads a disorderly or licentious life," from Old French revelour, agent noun from reveler "be disorderly; make merry" (see revel (v.)).

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frolic (v.)

"make merry, have fun, romp playfully," 1580s, from frolic (adj.) "joyous, merry, full of mirth" (1530s), from Middle Dutch vrolyc "happy," a compound of vro- "merry, glad" + lyc "like" (see like (adj.)). The first part of the compound is cognate with Old Norse frar "swift," Middle English frow "hasty," from PIE *preu- "to hop" (see frog (n.1)), giving the whole an etymological sense akin to "jumping for joy." Similar formation in German fröhlich "happy." Related: Frolicked; frolicking. As a noun from 1610s.

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feast (v.)

c. 1300, "partake of a feast," from Old French fester "to feast, make merry; observe (a holiday)" (Modern French fêter), from feste "religious festival" (see feast (n.)). Related: Feasted; feasting.

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hilarious (adj.)

1823, "cheerful," from Latin hilaris "cheerful, lively, merry, joyful, of good cheer" (see hilarity) + -ous. Meaning "boisterously joyful" is from 1835. Related: Hilariously.

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go-round (n.)

"act of going round," originally especially "a merry-go-round," 1886, from go (v.) + round (adv.). Figurative sense of "argument, bout, fight," etc. is from 1891.

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puckish (adj.)

"resembling the fairy Puck; merry and mischievous; like what Puck might do," 1867, from Puck + -ish. Related: Puckishly; puckishness.

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revel (v.)

early 14c., revelen, "to feast in a noisy manner, make merry;" late 14c., "take part in revels," from Old French reveler, also rebeller "be disorderly, make merry; rebel, be riotous," from Latin rebellare "to rebel" (see rebel (v.)). The meaning "take great pleasure in" is recorded by 1754. Related: Reveled; reveling; revelled; revelling.

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joyous (adj.)

c. 1300, from Anglo-French joyous, Old French joios "happy, cheerful, merry, glad" (12c., Modern French joyeux), from joie (see joy). Related: Joyously; joyousness.

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hilarity (n.)

mid-15c., from Latin hilaritatem (nominative hilaritas) "cheerfulness, gaiety, merriment," from hilaris "cheerful, merry," from Greek hilaros "cheerful, merry, joyous," related to hilaos "graceful, kindly," hilaskomai "to propitiate, appease, reconcile,"and probably from a suffixed form of a PIE root *selh- "reconcile" (source also of Latin solari "to comfort").

In ancient Rome, Hilaria (neuter plural of hilaris) were a class of holidays, times of pomp and rejoicing; there were public ones in honor of Cybele at the spring equinoxes as well as private ones on the day of a marriage or a son's birth.

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