Etymology
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melancholia (n.)

"mental condition characterized by great depression, sluggishness, and aversion to mental action," 1690s, from Modern Latin melancholia (see melancholy).

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psychodynamic (adj.)

also psycho-dynamic, 1856, in homeopathic publications, "pertaining to mental powers" (mesmerism, etc.), from psycho- + dynamic (adj.). By 1874 as "pertaining to psychodynamics," the science of the laws of mental action (George Henry Lewes).

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miniaturization (n.)

"process of using technology to make something very small," 1947, from miniaturize + noun ending -ation. Minification in the sense "process of making smaller" is attested from 1904, on analogy of magnification.

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edification (n.)
Origin and meaning of edification

mid-14c., in religious use, "a building up of the soul," from Old French edificacion "a building, construction; edification, good example," and directly from Latin aedificationem (nominative aedificatio) "construction, the process of building; a building, an edifice," in Late Latin "spiritual improvement," from past participle stem of aedificare "to build" (see edifice). Religious use is as translation of Greek oikodome in I Corinthians xiv. Meaning "mental improvement" is 1650s. Literal sense of "building" is rare in English, but Middle English bilding sometimes was used in religious writing to translate Latin aedificatio.

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tanning (n.)

late 15c., "process of tanning leather," verbal noun from tan (v.). Intransitive sense "process of getting suntan" is from 1944. Tanning booth is attested by 1978; tanning bed by 1981.

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alienist (n.)

"one who scientifically treats or studies mental illness," 1864, from French aliéniste, from alienation in the sense of "insanity, loss of mental faculty," from Latin alienare "deprive of reason, drive mad," literally "to make another's, estrange" (see alienate). The mental sense of alienate has since mostly died out in English, but Middle English had aliened from mind "deranged, not rational" (late 14c.), and alienation was used from 15c. in a sense of "loss or derangement of mental faculties, insanity."

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discuss (v.)

late 14c., discussen, "to examine, investigate," from Latin discuss-, past participle stem of discutere "to dash to pieces, agitate, strike or shake apart," in Late Latin and Medieval Latin also "to discuss, examine, investigate," from dis- "apart" (see dis-) + quatere "to shake" (see quash).

Meaning "examine by argument, debate," the usual modern sense, is from mid-15c. (implied in discussing). Sense evolution in Latin appears to have been from "smash apart" to "scatter, disperse," then in post-classical times (via the mental process involved) to "investigate, examine," then to "debate." Related: Discussed.

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psychotropic (adj.)

"affecting a person's mental state," especially "of or pertaining to drugs that affect mental states," 1956, from psycho- + -tropic, from Greek tropos "a turning," from trepein "to turn" (from PIE root *trep- "to turn"). Hence, what "turns" the mind.

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psychometrics (n.)

"the science of measuring mental capacities and processes," 1917, from psychometry; also see -ics.

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mentalist (n.)

1782, "one devoted to mental pleasures," from mental + -ist. Originally in reference to artistic taste; philosophical sense "one who believes matter in ultimate analysis is a mode of mind or consciousness" (from mentalism) is from 1900. Related: Mentalistic.

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