Etymology
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piece (v.)

c. 1400, pecen, "to mend (clothing) by adding pieces," from piece (n.1). Sense of "to join, unite or reunite, put together again" is from late 15c. Related: Pieced; piecing.

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repair (v.1)

"to mend, put back in order, restore to a sound, good, or complete condition," mid-14c., reparen, from Old French reparer "repair, mend" (12c.) and directly from Latin reparare "restore, put back in order," from re- "again" (see re-) + parare "make ready, prepare" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

The sense of "make amends for injury by an equivalent, make good" is by 1560s. Related: Repaired; repairing.

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cobble (v.)

late 15c., "to mend or patch" (especially shoes or boots), perhaps a back-formation from cobbler (n.1), or from cob, via a notion of lumps. Meaning "to put together clumsily" is from 1580s. Related: Cobbled; cobbling.

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penknife (n.)

also pen-knife, "small pocket-knife," early 15c., penne-knif, from pen (n.1) + knife (n.). So called because such small knives were used to make and mend quill pens.

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revamp (v.)

1850, "mend or patch up again," from re- "again" + vamp (v.) "patch up, replace the upper front part of a shoe." An earlier verb was new-vamp (1630s). Modern use is typically figurative. Related: Revamped; revamping.

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patch (v.)

mid-15c., pacchen, "to put a patch on, mend by adding a patch," from patch (n.1). Electronics sense of "to connect temporarily" is attested from 1923 on the notion of tying together various pieces of apparatus to form a circuit. Related: Patched; patching.

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clout (v.)

"to beat, strike with the hand," early 14c., from clout (n.), perhaps on the notion of hitting someone with a lump of something, or from the "patch of cloth" sense of that word (compare clout (v.) "to patch, mend," mid-14c.). Related: Clouted; clouting.

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masto- 

before vowels mast-, word-forming element meaning "female breast, mammary gland," from Greek mastos "woman's breast," from madan "to be wet, to flow," from PIE *mad- "wet, moist, dripping" (source also of Latin madere "be moist;" Albanian mend "suckle;" see mast (n.2)).

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point (v.)
Origin and meaning of point

late 14c., "indicate with the finger;" c. 1400, "wound by stabbing; make pauses in reading a text; seal or fill openings or joints or between tiles," partly from Old French pointoier "to prick, stab, jab, mark," and also from point (n.).

From mid-15c. as "to stitch, mend." From late 15c. as "furnish (a garment) with tags or laces for fastening;" from late 15c. as "aim (something), direct toward an object." Related: Pointed; pointing. To point up "emphasize" is from 1934; to point out "indicate, show, make manifest" is from 1570s.

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sartorial (adj.)

"pertaining to a tailor," 1807, from Modern Latin sartorius, from Late Latin sartor "tailor" (source also of French sartre "tailor"), literally "patcher, mender," from Latin sart-, past participle stem of sarcire "to patch, mend" (from PIE root *srko- "to make whole, make good"). The classical Latin word was sarcinator (fem. sarcinatrix).

 Earlier in English in same sense was sartorian (1660s). Sartorius as the name of the long leg muscle (1704) is because it is used in crossing the legs to bring them into the position needed to sit like a tailor. Related: Sartorially.

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