Etymology
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indiscreet (adj.)
"imprudent, not discrete, lacking good judgment," early 15c., from Medieval Latin indiscretus, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Latin discretus "separated, distinct" (in Medieval Latin "discerning, careful"), past participle of discernere "distinguish" (see discern). A Medieval Latin secondary sense of the word that also became indiscrete. Related: Indiscreetly; indiscreetness.
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hernial (adj.)
early 15c., from Medieval Latin hernialis, from hernia (see hernia).
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Lombardic 
1690s, from Lombard + -ic or from Medieval Latin Lombardicus.
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inferential (adj.)
1650s, from Medieval Latin inferentia (see inference) + -al (1). Related: Inferentially.
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sinfonia (n.)
1773, from Italian sinfonia, from Medieval Latin symphonia (see symphony).
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surplusage (n.)
c. 1400, from Medieval Latin surplusagium, from surplus (see surplus).
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hierarchic (adj.)
1680s, from Medieval Latin hierarchicus, from hierarchia (see hierarchy).
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Turkey 
country name, late 14c., from Medieval Latin Turchia, from Turcus (see Turk) + -ia.
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longitudinal (adj.)
late 14c., from Medieval Latin longitudinalis, from Latin longitudo (see longitude).
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surplice (n.)

"loose white robe," c. 1200, from Old French surpeliz (12c.), from Medieval Latin superpellicium (vestmentum) "a surplice," literally "an over fur (garment)," from Latin super "over" (see super-) + Medieval Latin pellicium "fur garment, tunic of skins," from Latin pellis "skin" (from PIE root *pel- (3) "skin, hide"). So called because it was donned over fur garments worn by clergymen for warmth in unheated medieval churches.

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