Etymology
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dietetics (n.)

"branch of medicine which relates to regulation of food and drink consumed," 1540s, see dietetic + -ics.

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laxative (adj.)
late 14c., "causing relaxation or looseness," from Old French laxatif (13c.), from Medieval Latin laxativus "loosening," from Latin laxat-, past participle stem of laxare "loosen," from laxus "loose, lax" (see lax). The noun meaning "a laxative medicine, a medicine that relieves constipation by relaxing the intestines" is from late 14c.
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paramedical (adj.)

"related to medicine in an auxiliary capacity," 1908, from para- (1) "subsidiary" + medical (adj.).

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biomedical (adj.)
also bio-medical, "pertaining to both biology and medicine," 1961, from bio- + medical (adj.).
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holistic (adj.)

1926, from holism (q.v.) + -istic. Holistic medicine is attested by 1960. Related: Holistically.

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dose (v.)

1650s, "give medicine to;" 1713, "administer in doses," from dose (n.). Related: Dosed; dosing.

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neonatology (n.)
branch of medicine concerned with newborn infants, 1960, from neonate "recently born infant" + -ology.
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antaphrodisiac (adj.)
1719, "used against sexual appetite;" 1742, "used against venereal disease;" from anti- + Greek aphrodisios "venereal" (see aphrodisiac). From 1753 as a noun, "medicine used against venereal disease." Antaphroditic is from 1706 as a noun, "medicine having the power to mitigate venereal disease;" 1755 as an adjective.
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addictive (adj.)
1815, a word in chemistry and medicine; 1939 in the narcotics sense, from addict (v.) + -ive. Related: Addictively; addictiveness.
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hot-blooded (adj.)

"passionate," 1590s; a relic of old medicine and medieval physiology theory; see hot (adj.) + blood (n.).

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