Etymology
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thematic (adj.)
1690s, in logic, from Greek thematikos, from thema (genitive thematos; see theme). From 1871 of writing or discourse. Related: Thematical; thematically.
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rehash (n.)

"old material worked up anew, something concocted from material formerly used," usually of literary productions, 1849, from rehash (v.).

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materialize (v.)

also materialise, 1710, "represent as material," from material (adj.) + -ize. Meaning "reduce to a material basis or standard" is by 1820. Intransitive meaning "appear in bodily form, make physically perceptible" is by 1866, originally in spiritualism. Related: Materialized; materializing.

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illogical (adj.)
"without sound reasoning according to rules of logic," 1580s, from assimilated form of in- (1) "not, opposite of" + logical. Related: Illogically.
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Venn diagram (n.)
1918 (Venn's diagram is from 1904), named for English logician John Venn (1834-1923) of Cambridge, who explained them in the book "Symbolic Logic" (1881).
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Aristotelian (adj.)
also Aristotelean, c. 1600, of or pertaining to the person or teachings of Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 B.C.E.), the father of logic.
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adequately (adv.)
1620s; see adequate + -ly (2); originally a term in logic in reference to correspondence of ideas and objects and probably based on Latin use. Meaning "suitably" is recorded from 1680s.
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accordingly (adv.)
mid-14c., "in agreement with" (now obsolete), from according + -ly (2). From mid-15c. as "properly, adequately;" meaning "agreeably with logic or expectation" is from 1680s.
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modal (adj.)

"pertaining to or affected by a mode," 1560s, originally a term in logic, from French modal and directly from Medieval Latin modalis "of or pertaining to a mode," from Latin modus "measure, extent, quantity; proper measure, rhythm, song; a way, manner, fashion, style" (in Late Latin also "mood" in grammar and logic), from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Musical sense is from 1590s; In grammar from 1798.

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demonstrative (adj.)

late 14c., demonstratif, "characterized by logic, based on logic, showing or making manifest the truth or existence (of something)," from Old French démonstratif (14c.) and directly from Latin demonstrativus "pointing out, demonstrating," from demonstrat-, past-participle stem of demonstrare "to indicate, describe" (see demonstration).

The grammatical sense, "pointing out the thing referred to," is from mid-15c.; general sense of "having the quality of clearly showing, illustrative" is by 1520s. Meaning "given to or characterized by strong outward expressions of feelings" is from 1819. Related: Demonstratively; demonstrativeness.

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