Etymology
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marry (interj.)

now obsolete, but a common oath in the Middle Ages and after, mid-14c., a corruption of the name of the Virgin Mary. It could mean "indeed, forsooth," be a term of asseveration, or be used to express surprise or any other feeling.

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gun moll (n.)
"female criminal," 1908, second element from nickname of Mary, used of disreputable females since early 1600s; first element from slang gonif "thief" (1885), from Yiddish, from Hebrew gannabh "thief" (compare gonoph); influenced by gun (n.).
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Marian (adj.)

"of Mary," 1701, referring to the Virgin, from Mary + -ian; also (c. 1600) in reference to the reign of Queen Mary of England, who reigned 1553-58; and (1902) to Mary Queen of Scots (1542-1587). Also "of or pertaining to Caius Marius," the noted Roman general (died 86 B.C.E.).

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Bloody Mary 

the cocktail, attested from 1947 (originally touted in part as a hangover cure), said to be named for Mary Tudor, queen of England 1553-58, who earned her epithet for vigorous prosecution of Protestants. The drink earned its, apparently, simply for being red from tomato juice. The cocktail's popularity also coincided with that of the musical "South Pacific," which has a character named "Bloody Mary."

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marigold (n.)

popular name of several plants with golden or bright yellow flowers, late 14c., marygolde, from Mary (probably a reference to the Virgin) + gold, for color. The Old English name for the flower was simply golde. Compare Dutch goudbloom, German Goldblume. As a color name, by 1770.

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Moll 

female proper name, shortened form of Mollie, Molly, itself a familiar of Mary. Used from c. 1600 for "prostitute," but in low slang by early 19c. it also meant "female companion not bound by ties of marriage, but often a life-mate" [Century Dictionary]. It became a general word for "woman" in old underworld slang, for instance Moll-buzzer "pickpocket who specializes in women;" Moll-tooler "female pick-pocket." U.S. sense of "a gangster's girlfriend" is by 1923.

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Anne 
alternative form of the fem. proper name Anna (q.v.). In Christian tradition, the name of the mother of the Virgin Mary.
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Tia Maria (n.)
coffee-flavored, rum-based liqueur, originally made in the West Indies, 1948, Spanish, literally "Aunt Mary."
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typhoid (adj.)
1800, literally "resembling typhus," from typhus + -oid. The noun is from 1861, a shortened form of typhoid fever (1845), so called because it originally was thought to be a variety of typhus. Typhoid Mary (1909) was Mary Mallon (d.1938), a typhoid carrier who worked as a cook and became notorious after it was learned she unwittingly had infected hundreds in U.S.
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Llanfair 
common in Welsh place names, literally "St. Mary's Church," from Welsh llan "church" (see land (n.)) + Mair "Mary," with lentition of m- to f-.
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