Etymology
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fabrication (n.)

c. 1500, fabricacioun, "manufacturing, construction," from Latin fabricationem (nominative fabricatio) "a structure, construction, a making," noun of action from past-participle stem of fabricare "to make, construct" (see fabricate). Meaning "lying, falsehood, forgery" is from 1790.

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replant (v.)

also re-plant, 1570s, "plant (a tree, etc.) again or anew," from re- "back, again" + plant (v.). By 1650s as "to resow, plant (ground) again." Related: Replanted; replanting.

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epiphyte (n.)

"plant which grows upon another plant," 1827, from epi- "upon" + -phyte "plant." Related: Epiphytal; epiphytous (1816).

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hemlock (n.)

poisonous plant native to Europe, transplanted to North America, Old English (Kentish) hemlic, earlier hymlice, hymblice, name of a poisonous plant; of unknown origin. Liberman suggests from root hem- "poison," perhaps with the plant name suffix -ling or -ig. As the name of the poison derived from the plant, c. 1600. The North American fir tree so called by 1670s in New England, from resemblance of the position and tenuity of its leaves to those of the plant.

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automation (n.)

1948, in the manufacturing sense, "the large-scale use of automatic equipment in production," coined by Ford Motor Co. Vice President Delmar S. Harder, from automatic (adj.) + -ion. Earlier (1838) was automatism, which meant "quality of being automatic" in the classical sense.

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eggplant (n.)

also egg-plant, plant cultivated for its large oblong or ovate fruit, which is highly esteemed as a vegetable, 1763, from egg (n.) + plant (n.). Originally of the white variety. Compare aubergine.

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ingrained (adj.)

"deeply rooted," 1590s, literally "dyed with grain "cochineal," the red dyestuff (see engrain). Figuratively, "thoroughly imbued" (of habits, principles, prejudices, etc.) from 1851. In reference to dyed carpets, etc., it is attested from 1766, from the manufacturing phrase in (the) grain "in the raw material before manufacture."

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Detroit 

city in Michigan, U.S., from French détroit, literally "straits," from Old French destreit (12c.), from Latin districtum, neuter of districtus (see district (n.)). A French fort was built there 1701. By 1918 the city name was synonymous with "U.S. automobile manufacturing."

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implant (v.)

1540s, "to plant in" (abstractly, of ideas, emotions, etc.), from French implanter "to insert, engraft" (alongside Old French emplanter "to plant"), literally "plant in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + planter "to plant" (see plant (n.)). Meaning "surgically implant (something) in the body" is from 1886, originally of teeth. Implanted is attested earlier, from early 15c., probably based on Medieval Latin implantus. Related: Implanting.

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Sheffield 

manufacturing city in Yorkshire, noted for cutlery and metalwork at least since 14c. (Chaucer's Sheffeld thwitel, a knife made in Sheffield). The name is from late Old English Scafeld "Open Land by the River Sheaf." The Old English river name is perhaps from sceað "boundary."

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