Etymology
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maltster (n.)

"maker of or dealer in malt," early 14c. (late 13c. as a surname), from malt + -ster.

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brasserie (n.)

"beer saloon in which food is served," 1864, from French brasserie "beer-garden attached to a brewery," from brasser "to brew," from Latin brace "grain used to prepare malt," said by Pliny to be a Celtic word (compare Welsh brag "malt").

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malty (adj.)

"composed of or produced by malt," 1817, from malt (n.) + -y (2). Also, in old slang, "drunk with beer, or drunkish any how, stupidly so" [John Bee, "Slang," 1823].

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liqueur (n.)

"sweetened, flavored alcoholic liquor," 1729, from French liqueur "liquor, liquid," from Old French licor "liquid." See liquor, which is the same word but borrowed earlier.

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swig (n.)

1540s, "a drink, liquor," later "big or hearty drink of liquor" (1620s), of unknown origin.

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sake (n.2)

Japanese fermented liquor made from rice, 1680s, from Japanese sake, literally "alcohol."

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rum-runner (n.)

"smuggler or transporter of illicit liquor," 1919, from rum (n.) + runner.

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applejack (n.)

also apple-jack, "apple-brandy, liquor distilled from cider," 1816, from apple + jack (n.).

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snort (n.)

1808, "act of snorting," from snort (v.). Meaning "a drink of liquor" (especially whiskey) is from 1889.

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steep (v.)

"to soak in a liquid," early 14c., of uncertain origin, originally in reference to barley or malt, probably cognate with Old Norse steypa "to pour out, throw" (perhaps from an unrecorded Old English cognate), from Proto-Germanic *staupijanan. Related: Steeped; steeping.

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