Etymology
Advertisement
sexuality (n.)

1789, "action or fact of being sexed or having distinctions between the sexes;" see sexual + -ity. Meaning "capability of sexual feelings" is from 1879. Meaning "(one's) sexual identity" is by 1980.

According to a strict biological definition sexuality is the characteristic of the male and female reproductive elements (genoblasts), and sex of the individuals in which the reproductive elements arise. A man has sex, a spermatozoon sexuality. [Albert H. Buck, M.D., ed., "Reference Handbook of the Medical Sciences," 1894]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
proliferative (adj.)

"reproductive, budding or sprouting into new similar forms," 1868, from proliferate + -ive.

Related entries & more 
generative (adj.)
late 14c., "reproductive, pertaining to propagation," from generate + -ive. Use in linguistics is attested by 1959. Related: Generativity.
Related entries & more 
patriarchy (n.)

1560s, "ecclesiastical province under a patriarch; church government by patriarchs," from Latinized form of Greek patriarkhia, from patriarkhēs "male chief or head of a family" (see patriarch). Meaning "system of society or government by fathers or elder males of the community" is recorded from 1630s.

Related entries & more 
masculine (adj.)

mid-14c., "belonging to the male grammatical gender;" late 14c., "of men, of male sex," from Old French masculin "of the male sex" (12c.), from Latin masculinus "male, of masculine gender," from masculus "male, masculine; worthy of a man," diminutive of mas (genitive maris) "male person, male," a word of unknown origin. The diminutive form might be by pairing association with femininus (see feminine). Meaning "having the appropriate qualities of the male sex, physically or mentally: Manly, virile, powerful" is attested by 1620s. As a noun, "masculine gender," from c. 1500.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
maleness (n.)

1660s, "masculinity," from male (adj.) + -ness. By 1890 as "state or quality of being of the male sex."

Related entries & more 
biological (adj.)
"pertaining to the science of life," 1840, from biology + -ical. Biological clock, "innate mechanism that regulates cyclic activities of living things," is attested from 1955; not especially of human reproductive urges until c. 1991. Biological warfare is from 1946. Related: Biologically. Alternative adjective biologic is from 1850.
Related entries & more 
manchild (n.)

also man-child, "male child, male infant," late 14c., from man (n.) + child.

Related entries & more 
spore (n.)

"reproductive body in flowerless plants corresponding to the seeds of flowering ones," 1836, from Modern Latin spora, from Greek spora "a seed, a sowing, seed-time," related to sporas "scattered, dispersed," sporos "a sowing," from PIE *spor-, variant of root *sper- "to spread, sow" (see sparse).

Related entries & more 

Page 2