Etymology
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sexuality (n.)

1789, "action or fact of being sexed or having distinctions between the sexes;" see sexual + -ity. Meaning "capability of sexual feelings" is from 1879. Meaning "(one's) sexual identity" is by 1980.

According to a strict biological definition sexuality is the characteristic of the male and female reproductive elements (genoblasts), and sex of the individuals in which the reproductive elements arise. A man has sex, a spermatozoon sexuality. [Albert H. Buck, M.D., ed., "Reference Handbook of the Medical Sciences," 1894]
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lymphadenopathy (n.)

1899, from lymphadeno- "pertaining to a lymph gland" (from lymph + Greek adēnos, genitive of adēn "gland") + -pathy. Lymphadenoma is from 1870.

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adenoidal (adj.)

1852, "gland-like, resembling a gland," from adenoid + -al (1). From 1919 as "having the appearance of one with adenoids."

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thymus (n.)

gland near the base of the neck, 1690s, Modern Latin, from Greek thymos "a warty excrescence," used of the gland by Galen, literally "thyme," probably so called because of a fancied resemblance to a bud of thyme (see thyme). Related: Thymic.

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proliferative (adj.)

"reproductive, budding or sprouting into new similar forms," 1868, from proliferate + -ive.

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glandular (adj.)

1740, from French glandulaire, from glandule "small gland" (16c.), from Latin glandula (see gland). Earlier was glandelous (late 14c.), from Latin glandulosus.

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glanders (n.)

"horse disease characterized by glandular swelling," early 15c., from Old French glandres "swollen glands," plural of glandre "gland," from Latin glandula (see gland).

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generative (adj.)

late 14c., "reproductive, pertaining to propagation," from generate + -ive. Use in linguistics is attested by 1959. Related: Generativity.

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adenoid (adj.)

1839, "gland-like," from medical Latin adenoideus, from Greek adenoeides, from adēn (genitive adēnos) "gland" (see adeno-) + eidos "form" (see -oid). Adenoids (n.) "adenoid growths" is attested by 1856.

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