Etymology
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batik (n.)
Javanese technique of textile design, 1880, from Dutch, from Malay (Austronesian) mbatik, said to be from amba "to write" + titik "dot, point."
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paddy (n.1)

1620s, "rice plant," from Malay (Austronesian) padi "rice in the straw." Main modern meaning "rice field, ground where rice is growing" (1948) is a shortening of paddy field.

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Mata Hari 
stage name taken by exotic dancer Margaretha Gertruida Zelle (1876-1917), from Malay (Austronesian) mata "eye" + hari "day, dawn."
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gutta-percha (n.)
1845, from Malay (Austronesian) getah percha, literally "the gum of percha," the name of the tree; the form of the word was influenced by Latin gutta "drop." As the name of the tree itself, from 1860.
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gong (n.)
c. 1600, from Malay (Austronesian) gong, which is probably imitative of its sound when struck. As a verb by 1853. Related: Gonged; gonging.
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kris (n.)
short Malay dagger with a wavy blade, 1570s, said to be a Javanese word. In early use also spelled creese, etc.
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Papuan (n.)

1814 in reference to the race that inhabits New Guinea (the large island north of Australia); earlier simply Papua (1610s), from Malay (Austronesian) papuah "frizzled." As an adjective by 1869.

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lory (n.)
small parrot of New Guinea and Australia, 1690s, from Malay (Austronesian) luri, name of kind of parrot, said to be a dialectal variant of nuri. Related: Lorikeet.
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dugong (n.)

large, aquatic herbivorous mammal of the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, 1800 (by 1789 in French), from Malay (Austronesian) duyung, which is dugung in the Philippines.

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satay (n.)

Indonesian dish consisting of spicy bits or balls of meat grilled or barbecued on skewers, a popular street food, 1934, from Malay or Javanese (Austronesian) satai.

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