Etymology
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make-up (n.)

also makeup, "manner in which something is put together," 1821, from the verbal phrase (see make (v.) + up (adv.)). To make up "build, collect into one form by bringing together" is from late 14c., also "prepare." It is attested from late 15c. as "supply as an equivalent," from 1660s as "end a quarrel, reconcile, settle differences, become friends again," by 1825 as "to fabricate artfully" (a story, etc.).

In reference to an actor, "prepare for impersonating a role" (including dress and the painting of the face), by 1808. Hence the noun sense of "appearance of the face and dress" (1858) and the sense of "cosmetics," attested by 1886, originally of actors.

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leg-work (n.)
also legwork, 1891, from leg (n.) + work (n.). Originally news reporter slang for an assignment that promised more walking than copy.
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master-work (n.)

c. 1600, "an action of chief importance;" 1610s, "a work of pre-eminent merit, a masterpiece," from master (n.) + work (n.). Probably based on a Dutch or German model (compare Middle Low German mesterwerk, German Meisterwerk).

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work-up (n.)

"diagnostic examination of a patient," 1961, from the verbal phrase; see work (v.) + up (adv.).

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case-work (n.)
"social work carried out by the study of individuals," 1896, from case (n.1) in the clinical sense + work (n.). Related: Case-worker (1909).
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watch-work (n.)
1660s, from watch (n.) in the "timepiece" sense + work (n.).
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braze (v.2)
"to make of or cover in brass," Old English brasian "to do work in brass, make of brass," from bræs (see brass (n.)). Compare glaze from glass.
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crochet (v.)

1848, intransitive, "to make a fabric by hooking a thread into meshes with a crochet-needle," from crochet (n.). Transitive sense of "to make in crochet-work" is by 1855. Related: Crocheted; crocheting.

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slim (v.)
1808, "to scamp one's work, do carelessly or superficially," from slim (adj.). Meaning "to make slim" (a garment, etc.) is from 1862; meaning "reduce (one's) weight" is from 1930. Related: Slimmed; slimming.
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factotum (n.)
"one who does all kinds of work for another," 1560s, from Medieval Latin factotum "do everything," from fac, imperative of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put") + totum "all" (see total (adj.)).
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