Etymology
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homemaker (n.)
also home-maker, "woman considered as a domestic agent," by 1861, American English, from home (n.) + agent noun from make (v.).
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makeover (n.)

also make-over, "change of a person's appearance," especially by hair-styling and cosmetics, by 1981, from phrase make over in sense "to refashion, reconstruct" (1690s); from make (v.) + over (adv.). Make over in the sense of "transfer the title of, convey" is recorded by 1540s.

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makeshift 

also make-shift, 1560s, as a noun, "shifty person, rogue" (a sense now obsolete; for the formation, compare makeweight), from make (v.) + shift (n.). As an adjective, 1680s, "of the nature of a temporary expedient," which led to the noun sense of "that with which one meets a present need or turn, a temporary substitute" (by 1802).

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love-making (n.)
"courtship," mid-15c.; see love (n.) + make (v.). Phrase make love is attested from 1570s in the sense "pay amorous attention to;" as a euphemism for "have sex," it is attested from c. 1950.
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bookmaker (n.)
also book-maker, 1510s, "printer and binder of books," from book (n.) + agent noun from make (v.). The wagering sense "professional bettor" is from 1862. Related: Book-making (late 15c., betting sense 1824).
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rainmaker (n.)

also rain-maker, "sorcerer who claims the power of producing a fall of rain by supernatural means," 1775, in reference to American Indian tribal magicians, from rain (n.) + agent noun of make (v.).

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unmake (v.)
late 14c., "bring down, dethrone;" early 15c., "undo, destroy, reduce to an unmade state," from un- (2) "reverse, opposite of" + make (v.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch ontmaken, German entmachen.
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remake (v.)

also re-make, "make anew, reconstruct," 1630s, from re- "back, again" + make (v.). Related: Remade; remaking. As a noun, in reference to movies, "a new making of a film or script (typically with different actors)," by 1933 ("Smilin' Through"). The verb was used of movies by 1910s).

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merrymaking (n.)

also merry-making, "a convivial entertainment, a mirthful festival," 1714, from an inversion of the verbal phrase make merry "be happy, be cheerful, be joyous, frolic" (late 14c.); see make (v.) + merry (adj.). The earlier noun was merry-make (1570s). Related: Merry-maker (1827).

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haymaker (n.)
mid-15c. as the name of an agricultural occupation, "one who cuts and dries grass" (hay-making is attested from c. 1400); 1910 in the sense of "very strong blow with the fist," from hay + agent noun of make; the punch probably so called for resemblance to the wide swinging stroke of a scythe. Haymaker punch attested from 1907.
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