Etymology
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main-top (n.)

also maintop, "top of the mainmast," late 15c.; see mainmast + top (n.1). By 1725 as "platform just below the head of the mainmast."

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street-car (n.)
"passenger car for city travel," horse-drawn at first, later cable-powered, 1859, American English, from street (n.) + car (n.).
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street-walker (n.)
"common prostitute," 1590s, from street (n.) + agent noun from walk (v.).
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Grub-street (n.)
1620s, "originally the name of a street in Moorfields in London, much inhabited by writers of small histories, dictionaries, and temporary poems; whence any mean production is called grubstreet" [Johnson]. The place was renamed 1830 to Milton Street (after a local developer) then erased entirely 1970s by the Barbicon complex.
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off-street (adj.)

1929, in reference to automobile parking, "not on a public street," from off (prep.) + street.

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Carnaby Street (n.)
street in Soho, London (Westminster), in mid-1960s lined with fashionable boutiques and clothing shops, hence used figuratively from 1964 for "(contemporary) English stylishness." It was named for Karnaby House, built 1683, from a surname or transferred from Carnaby in Yorkshire, which is from a Scandinavian personal name + -by (see by).
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cross-street (n.)

"a street crossing another," 1704, from cross- + street.

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highway (n.)

Old English heahweg "main road from one town to another;" see high (adj.) in sense of "main" + way (n.).

High street (Old English heahstræte) was the word before 17c. applied to highways and main roads, whether in the country or town, especially one of the Roman roads. In more recent usage, it generally is the proper name of the street of a town which is built upon a highway and was the principal street of the place.

Highway robbery, robbery committed near a highway, is from 1707, formerly the only sort punishable in common law by death; as a trivial expression for something too costly, by 1886.

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hydrant (n.)
"apparatus for drawing water from a street main," 1806, from Greek hydr-, stem of hydor "water" (from suffixed form of PIE root *wed- (1) "water; wet") + -ant. OED double-damns it as "Irregularly formed" and "of U.S. origin."
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Buffalo 

city in western New York state, U.S., of disputed origin (there never were bison thereabouts), perhaps from the name of a native chief, or a corruption of French beau fleuve "beautiful river." Buffalo wings finger food so called because the recipe was invented in Buffalo (1964, at Frank & Teressa's Anchor Bar on Main Street).

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