Etymology
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tesla (n.)
"unit of magnetic flux density," 1960, from Nikola Tesla (1856-1943), Croatian-born U.S. engineer. Tesla coil is attested from 1896.
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gauss 
C.G.S. unit of intensity of a magnetic field, 1882, named for German mathematician Karl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855). Related: Gaussage; gaussian.
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cassette (n.)

1793, "a little box," from French cassette, from a diminutive of Old North French casse "box" (see case (n.2)). Meaning "magnetic tape cartridge" is from 1960.

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degauss (v.)

"de-magnetize," originally especially of ships as a defense against magnetic mines, 1940, from de- + the name of German scientist Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855), a pioneer in the study of magnetics.

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biomagnetism (n.)
also bio-magnetism, 1874, "animal magnetism," the supposed fluid or influence transmitted from one person to another and capable of modifying organic action, as in hypnosis; from German Biomagnetismus (1868); see bio- + magnetism. Later (by 1992) "the phenomenon of magnetic fields produced by living organisms."
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solenoid (n.)

"coil of insulated wire carrying an electrical current and having magnetic properties," 1827, from French solénoïde, from Greek sōlēnoeidēs "pipe-shaped," from sōlēn "pipe, channel" + combining form of eidos "form, shape" (see -oid). Related: Solenoidal.

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magnetosphere (n.)

coined 1959, from magneto- + sphere. So called because it is the region around the earth (and some other planets) in which the magnetic field of the planet plays a dominant role in the motion of particles.

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erase (v.)

c. 1600, from Latin erasus, past participle of eradere "scrape out, scrape off, shave; abolish, remove," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + radere "to scrape" (see raze (v.)). Of magnetic tape, from 1945. Related: Erased; erasing.

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agonic (adj.)

"having no angle," 1846, from Greek agonos, from a- "not" (see a- (3)) + -gonos "angled," from gōnia "angle, corner" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). In reference to the imaginary line on the earth's surface connecting points where the magnetic declination is zero.

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magnetism (n.)

1610s, "the characteristic properties of a magnet," from Modern Latin magnetismus (see magnet + -ism). Figurative sense of "personal charm, attractive power or influence" is from 1650s; in the hypnotic sense it is from Mesmer (see mesmerism). Meaning "science of magnets and magnetic phenomena" is by early 19c.

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