Etymology
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self-love (n.)
also self love, 1560s, from self- + love (n.).
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love-longing (n.)
c. 1300, luue langing, from love (n.) + longing (n.).
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love-scene (n.)

"a marked exhibition of mutual love; an interview between lovers; a pictured, written, or acted representation of such an interview" [Century Dictionary], by 1630s, from love (n.) + scene

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love-child (n.)

"child born out of wedlock, child of illicit love," 1798, from love (n.) + child. Compare German Liebeskind. Earlier was love brat (17c.).

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love-making (n.)
"courtship," mid-15c.; see love (n.) + make (v.). Phrase make love is attested from 1570s in the sense "pay amorous attention to;" as a euphemism for "have sex," it is attested from c. 1950.
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loving (n.)
"love, friendship," also "sexual love," late 14c., verbal noun from love (v.).
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lovesick (adj.)
also love-sick, "languishing with amorous desire," 1520s, from love (n.) + sick (adj.). Related: Lovesickness.
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loveless (adj.)
early 14c., "feeling no love;" late 14c. "unloved, not attracting love," from love (n.) + -less. Attested from mid-13c. as a surname. Related: Lovelessly; lovelessness.
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lovey 
affectionate pet name, 1731, from love (n.) + -y (3). Extended form lovey-dovey attested from 1819 (n.), 1847 as an adjective.
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lovestruck (adj.)
also love-struck, by 1762, from love (n.) + struck, from strike (v.). Love-stricken is attested from 1805.
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