Etymology
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sorcery (n.)
c. 1300, "witchcraft, magic, enchantment; act or instance of sorcery; supernatural state of affairs; seemingly magical works," from Old French sorcerie, from sorcier "sorcerer, wizard," from Medieval Latin sortiarius "teller of fortunes by lot; sorcerer," literally "one who influences fate or fortune," from Latin sors (genitive sortis) "lot, fate, fortune" (see sort (n.)).
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fortune-teller (n.)
also fortuneteller, 1580s, from fortune + teller. Verbal phrase tellen fortune is from early 15c.; verbal noun fortune-telling is by 1570s. Lot-teller is from 1570s.
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cleromancy (n.)

"divination by throwing dice," c. 1600, from French cléromancie, from Latinized form of Greek klēros "lot" (see clerk (n.)) + manteia "oracle, divination" (see -mancy).

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moerologist (n.)

also moirologist, "professional mourner," by 1868, from Greek moira "part, lot, fate" (see Moira) + -logia, from root of legein "to speak" (see -logy). Related: Moerology.

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conscription (n.)

late 14c., "a putting in writing, a written record," from Latin conscriptionem (nominative conscriptio) "a drawing up of a list, enrollment, a levying of soldiers," noun of action from past-participle stem of conscribere "to enroll," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

Meaning "enlistment (of soldiers)" is from 1520s; the sense "compulsory enrollment by lot or selection of suitable men for military or naval service" (1800) is traceable to the French Republic act of Sept. 5, 1798. Technically, a conscription is the enrollment of a fixed number by lot, with options of providing a substitute.

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Lowestoft (n.)
type of porcelain, named for a town in Suffolk where it was made from 1757. The place name is "Hlothver's Toft," from genitive singular of the proper name + Old Norse toft "a building lot," also "a deserted site."
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Moira 

fem. proper name, also the name of one of the Fates, from Greek Moira, literally "share, fate," related to moros "fate, destiny, doom," meros "part, lot," meiresthai "to receive one's share" (from PIE root *(s)mer- (2) "to get a share of something").

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jag (n.1)
"period of unrestrained activity," 1887, American English, perhaps via intermediate sense of "as much drink as a man can hold" (1670s), from earlier meaning "load of hay or wood" (1590s), of unknown origin. Used in U.S. colloquial speech from 1834 to mean "a quantity, a lot."
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homestead (n.)
Old English hamstede "home, town, village," from home (n.) + stead (q.v.). In U.S. usage, "a lot of land adequate for the maintenance of a family" (1690s), defined by the Homestead Act of 1862 as 160 acres. Similar formation in Dutch heemstede, Danish hjemsted.
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fixer (n.)
1849, of chemicals, etc.; 1885 as a person who "makes things right;" agent noun from fix (v.). Fixer-upper is from 1967 as "that which repairs other things" (in an advertisement for a glue); by 1976 as a real-estate euphemism for "property that needs a lot of work."
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