Etymology
Advertisement
Bordeaux 
city in southwestern France, Roman Burdigala (1c.), perhaps from a Celtic or pre-Celtic source the sense of which has been lost. From 1560s as a type of wine imported from the city.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
arch-fiend (n.)

1667, from arch (adj.) + fiend (n.). Originally and typically Satan (arch-foe "Satan" is from 1610s).

So stretcht out huge in length the Arch-fiend lay. ["Paradise Lost," 1667]
Related entries & more 
satanic (adj.)

1667 (in "Paradise Lost"), Satanic, "pertaining to Satan," from Satan + -ic. The meaning "diabolical, characteristic of Satan, extremely wicked" is from 1793, usually without capital. Related: Satanical (1540s); satanically.

Related entries & more 
Corinth 
city in Greece, from Latin Corinthus, from Greek Korinthos, from Pelasgian *kar- "point, peak." The -nthos identifies it as being from the lost pre-IE language of Greece.
Related entries & more 
furore (n.)
1790, Italian form of furor, borrowed into English originally in the sense "enthusiastic popular admiration;" it later descended to mean the same thing as furor and lost its usefulness.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
swoon (v.)
c. 1200, "to become unconscious," probably from a lost Old English verb *swogan (as in Old English aswogan "to choke"), of uncertain origin. Compare Low German swogen "to sigh." Related: Swooned; swooning.
Related entries & more 
list (n.4)
c. 1200, "pleasure, enjoyment;" mid-13c., "desire, wish, will, choice," from list (v.4). Somehow English has lost listy (adj.) "pleasant, willing (to do something); ready, quick" (mid-15c.).
Related entries & more 
veritable (adj.)
early 15c., from Anglo-French and Old French veritable "true, real, truthful, valid (in law)," from verité (see verity) + -able. Probably lost mid-17c. and reborrowed or revived after 1830. Related: Veritably.
Related entries & more 
scuffy (adj.)

"lacking or having lost the original finish and freshness," hence "shabby-looking," 1858; see scuff (v.) + -y (2). Past-participle adjective scuffed in the sense of "worn, shabby" is by 1819. Related: Scuffiness.

Related entries & more 
silphium (n.)
plant genus, 1771, from Latin, from Greek Silphion, name of a North African Mediterranean plant whose identity has been lost, the gum or juice of which was prized by the ancients as a condiment and a medicine. Probably of African origin.
Related entries & more 

Page 2