Etymology
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Bordeaux 
city in southwestern France, Roman Burdigala (1c.), perhaps from a Celtic or pre-Celtic source the sense of which has been lost. From 1560s as a type of wine imported from the city.
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arch-fiend (n.)

1667, from arch (adj.) + fiend (n.). Originally and typically Satan (arch-foe "Satan" is from 1610s).

So stretcht out huge in length the Arch-fiend lay. ["Paradise Lost," 1667]
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satanic (adj.)

1667 (in "Paradise Lost"), Satanic, "pertaining to Satan," from Satan + -ic. The meaning "diabolical, characteristic of Satan, extremely wicked" is from 1793, usually without capital. Related: Satanical (1540s); satanically.

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Corinth 
city in Greece, from Latin Corinthus, from Greek Korinthos, from Pelasgian *kar- "point, peak." The -nthos identifies it as being from the lost pre-IE language of Greece.
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furore (n.)
1790, Italian form of furor, borrowed into English originally in the sense "enthusiastic popular admiration;" it later descended to mean the same thing as furor and lost its usefulness.
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Shangri La (n.)
imaginary earthly paradise, 1938, from Shangri La, name of Tibetan utopia in James Hilton's novel "Lost Horizon" (1933, film version 1937). In Tibetan, la means "mountain pass."
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Ithuriel's spear 
the image is from "Paradise Lost," and turns up in late 19c. literature. The weapon caused anything it touched to assume its true form. Ithuriel is an archangel in the poem. The name is older and appears to be Kabbalistic.
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swoon (v.)
c. 1200, "to become unconscious," probably from a lost Old English verb *swogan (as in Old English aswogan "to choke"), of uncertain origin. Compare Low German swogen "to sigh." Related: Swooned; swooning.
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list (n.4)
c. 1200, "pleasure, enjoyment;" mid-13c., "desire, wish, will, choice," from list (v.4). Somehow English has lost listy (adj.) "pleasant, willing (to do something); ready, quick" (mid-15c.).
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veritable (adj.)
early 15c., from Anglo-French and Old French veritable "true, real, truthful, valid (in law)," from verité (see verity) + -able. Probably lost mid-17c. and reborrowed or revived after 1830. Related: Veritably.
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