Etymology
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bibliology (n.)
"book-lore," 1804, from French bibliologie; see biblio- + -logy. By 1871 as "Biblical literature."
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La-Z-Boy 
brand of recliner chair, 1929, Floral City Furniture Co., Monroe, Michigan, U.S. According to company lore, chosen from names submitted in a contest. See lazy + boy.
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Salome 

fem. proper name, from Late Latin, from Greek Salome, from Hebrew Shlomit, which is related to shalom "peace" and to Solomon. In biblical lore, the name of the daughter of Herod II and Herodias.

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sasquatch (n.)

one of a race of huge, hairy man-monsters supposed to inhabit the Pacific northwest woods in Native American lore and also known as bigfoot, 1929, from Halkomelem (Salishan), a native language of the Pacific Northwest, sæsq'ec [Bright].

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sandman (n.)

fabulous person who brings sleep in nursery lore, 1861, from sand (n.), probably in reference to hard grains found in the eyelashes on waking, or the rubbing of tired eyes as if to clear them of grit. First attested in English in a translation from the Norwegian of Andersen (his Ole Lukoie "Ole Shut-eye," based on old Danish lore, about a being who makes children sleepy, came out 1842). The English word also is perhaps partly from German Sandmann. More common in U.S.; dustman with the same sense is attested from 1821.

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foxglove (n.)
Old English foxes glofa, literally "fox's glove." The flower shape is that of the finger of a glove (compare German Fingerhut "foxglove," literally "thimble," the source of digitalis). The reason for fox is lost in the mute past of English herb-lore. Compare Old English plant names foxesfot ("fox's foot") "xiphion;" foxesclate ("fox's bur") "burdock."
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bambino (n.)
1761, "image of the Christ child in swaddling clothes," especially as exhibited in Italian churches at Christmastime, from Italian bambino, "baby, little child," a diminutive of bambo "simple" (compare Latin bambalio "dolt," Greek bambainein "to stammer"), of imitative origin. In U.S. baseball lore, a nickname of George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. (1895-1948).
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mythology (n.)

early 15c., "exposition of myths, the investigation and interpretation of myths," from Late Latin mythologia, from Greek mythologia "legendary lore, a telling of mythic legends; a legend, story, tale," from mythos "myth" (a word of unknown origin; see myth) + -logia (see -logy "study"). Meaning "a body or system of myths" is recorded by 1781.

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Oberon 

king of the faeries and husband of Titania in medieval lore, from French Obéron, from Old French Auberon, perhaps from a Germanic source related to elf. The satellite of Uranus of that name was discovered by William Herschel on Jan. 11, 1787, the same day he discovered the larger Uranian moon, Titania.

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pundit (n.)

1670s, "learned Hindu," especially one versed in Sanskrit lore, science, law, or religion, from Hindi payndit "a learned man, master, teacher," from Sanskrit payndita-s "a learned man, scholar," a word of uncertain origin. Broader application in English to "any learned man" is recorded by 1816. Related: Punditry.

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