Etymology
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pro tempore 

"temporary," Latin, literally "for the time (being)," from pro "for" (see pro-) + ablative singular of tempus "time" (see temporal). Abbreviated form pro tem is attested by 1828.

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T and A (n.)
1972, short for tits and ass (a phrase attributed to Lenny Bruce), in reference to salacious U.S. mass media; earlier it was medical shorthand for "tonsils and adenoids" (1942).
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Richter 

in reference to the logarithmic scale for expressing magnitude of earthquakes, 1938, named for its deviser, U.S. seismologist Charles Francis Richter (1900-1985). Figurative use by 1967.

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Pap test (n.)
1963, short for Papanicolaou (1947) in reference to George Nicholas Papanicolaou (1883-1962), Greek-born U.S. anatomist who developed the technique of examining secreted cells to test for cancer.
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pro tanto 

Latin, literally "for so much; to such an extent," from pro "for, so far as" (see pro-) + ablative singular neuter of tantus "so much," from tam "so" (see tandem).

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care package (n.)
1945, originally CARE package, supplies sent out by "Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe," established 1945 by U.S. private charities to coordinate delivery of aid packages to displaced persons in Europe after World War II and obviously named for the sake of the acronym. Name reupholstered late 1940s to "Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere," to reflect its expanded mission.
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sui juris 
1610s, "of full legal age and capacity," in ancient Rome, "of the status of one not subject to the patria potestas." For first element, see sui generis; for second element, see jurist.
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ad hoc 
Latin phrase, "to this, with respect to this, for this (specific purpose)," from ad "to" (see ad-) + hoc, neuter accusative of hic "this." Hence, "appointed or enacted for some particular purpose" (1879).
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think tank (n.)
also think-tank, 1959 as "research institute" (first reference is to Center for Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, Calif.); it had been colloquial for "the brain" since 1905. See think + tank (n.).
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