Etymology
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Pima 
Uto-Aztecan people of Arizona, from Spanish, probably from native pi ma:c "(I) don't know," given in answer to some question long ago and mistaken by the Spaniards as a tribal name. Related: Piman.
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San Francisco 
city in California, U.S., named in Spanish for St. Francis of Assisi; the name first recorded in reference to this region 1590s, reinforced by long association of the area with the Franciscan order.
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Colosseum (n.)

1560s, also formerly Coliseum, Medieval Latin name for the classical Amphitheatrum Flavium (begun c. 70 C.E.), noun use of neuter of adjective colosseus "gigantic;" perhaps a reference to the colossal statue of Nero that long stood nearby (see colossus).

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Cronus 

from Latinized form of Greek Kronos, youngest of the first generation of Titans, and their leader; a name of uncertain origin but probably not related to Khronos, personification of time, except in folk-etymology.

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Parkinson's Law 
1955 (in the "Economist" of Nov. 19), named for its deviser, British historian and journalist Cyril Northcote Parkinson (1909-1993): "work expands to fill the time available for its completion."
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Turin 
city in northern Italy, Italian Torino, Roman Augusta Taurinorum, probably from the Taurini, a Ligurian people who had a capital there, the name perhaps from Celtic *tauro "mountain" or *tur "water," but long interpreted by folk etymology as from Latin taurus "bull."
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Timothy 
masc. proper name, from French Timothée, from Latin Timotheus, from Greek Timotheos, literally "honoring God," from time "honor, respect" (see timocracy) + theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts).
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Cher 
U.S. pop performer, born Cherilyn Sarkisian (1946). As a given name for girls in U.S., it hit a bump of popularity 1972-73 around the time she starred in a popular TV variety show.
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clematis (n.)

plant genus, mostly herbaceous climbers, 1550s, "periwinkle," from Latin clematis, from Greek klematis, in Dioscorides as the name of a climbing or trailing plant (OED says probably the periwinkle) with long and lithe branches, diminutive of klema "vine-branch, shoot or twig broken off" (for grafting), from klan "to break" (see clastic).

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Ogygian (adj.)

"of great antiquity or age," 1809, from Greek Ōgygos, Ōgygēs, Ōgygios, name of a mythical king of Attica or Boeotia (or both) of whom nothing is known and who even in classical times was thought to have lived very long ago. Also sometimes with reference to a famous flood said to have occurred in his day.

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