Etymology
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long-winded (adj.)
also longwinded, 1580s, "given to lengthy speeches," from long (adj.) + adjective from wind (n.1) in the secondary Middle English sense "breath in speaking" (early 14c.). "Using much breath," hence "tedious from length."
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long-lived (adj.)
"having long life," c. 1400, from long (adv.) + past participle of live (v.). Old English had langlife "long-lived."
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time-sharing (n.)
1953, as a computing term, from time (n.) + verbal noun from share (v.). In real estate, as an arrangement in property use, it is recorded from 1976.
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good-time (adj.)
1928, from the noun phrase, from good (adj.) + time (n.). Expression to have a good time "enjoy oneself" attested from 1822; earlier have a good time of it (1771). To make good time "go fast" is from 1838. In Middle English, good time was "prosperous time," also "high time" (that something be done).
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time-span (n.)
also timespan, 1897, from time (n.) + span (n.1).
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small-time (adj.)
1910, originally theater slang for lower-salaried circuits, or ones requiring more daily performances; from noun phrase (also 1910). Compare big time.
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play-time (n.)
also playtime, 1660s in the recreational sense, from play (n.) + time (n.).
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run-time (n.)

"length of time taken in a particular task," 1974, originally in computing; see run (v.) + time (n.). In computing, run (n.) "instance of execution of a program" is by 1946.

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time-server (n.)
"one who adapts his manners and opinions to the times," 1580s, from expression serve the time "shape one's views to what is in favor" (1550s), translating Latin tempori servire. See time (n.) + serve (v.).
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big time (n.)
"upper reaches of a profession or pursuit," by 1909 in vaudeville slang. As an adjective by 1915. The same phrase was common in colloquial use late 19c.-early 20c. in a broad range of senses: "party, shindig, fun, frolic."
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