Etymology
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locksmith (n.)
"a maker of locks," early 13c., from lock (n.1) + smith (n.).
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lockable (adj.)
1832, from lock (v.) + -able. Related: Lockability.
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gridlock 
1980 (n.); 1987 (v.); from grid (n.) + lock (n.1). Related: Gridlocked; gridlocking.
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picklock (n.)

1550s, "person who picks locks;" 1590s, "instrument for picking and opening a lock;" from pick (v.) + lock (n.1).

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lockdown (n.)
also lock-down, from late 19c. in various mechanical senses, from the verbal phrase; see lock (v.) + down (adv.). Prison sense is by 1975, American English.
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interlock (v.)
1630s, "to be locked together," from inter- "between" + lock (v.). Related: Interlocked; interlocking. As a noun, attested by 1856.
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oarlock (n.)

"hole or indentation in the gunwale of a boat where an oar rests," mid-14c., or-lok, from oar + lock (n.1).

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landlocked (adj.)
also land-locked, "almost shut in by land," 1620s, from land (n.) + past participle of lock (v.).
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firelock (n.)
type of gun lock that uses sparks to ignite the priming, 1540s, from fire (n.) + lock (n.1). Originally of the wheel-lock; transferred 17c. to the flintlock.
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padlock (n.)

"removable lock with a pivoted bow or hasp," late 15c., pad-lok, from lock (n.1), but the first element is of obscure origin; perhaps originally, as some sources suggest, "a lock for a pannier."

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