Etymology
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amphibian (n.)
"one of the class of animals between fishes and reptiles, having gills and living in water in the early stage of life, later living on land," 1835; from amphibian (adj.). Amphibia was used in this sense from c. 1600.
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rustication (n.)

1620s, "action of retiring to or living in the country," from Latin rusticationem (nominative rusticatio) "act or fact of living in the country," noun of action from past-participle stem of rusticari "live or stay in the country," from rusticus (see rustic).

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biosynthesis (n.)
"production of chemical substances by living organisms," 1930; see bio- + synthesis.
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acclimatize (v.)

1824, "modify a living thing to suit a foreign climate" (transitive); see acclimate + -ize. A more recent formation than acclimate and generally replacing it in this sense. Related: Acclimatized; acclimatizing. Simple climatize is attested from 1826 as "inure (a living thing) to a climate."

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amphibious (adj.)
1640s, "combining two qualities; having two modes of life," especially "living both on land and in water," from Latinized form of Greek amphibios "having a double life; living on land and in water" (see amphibian (adj.)). Of motor vehicles, from 1915.
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quickset (adj.)

"formed of living plants," 1530s, from earlier noun, "a living plant set to grow for a hedge" (late 15c.), from quick (n.) "a live fence or hedge formed of some growing plant," especially hawthorn (mid-15c.); see quick (adj.) + set (v.).

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commensalism (n.)

"commensal existence or mode of living," 1870, from commensal + -ism.

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bioluminescence (n.)
also bio-luminescence, "emission of light by living organisms," 1909; see bio- + luminescence.
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epizoic (adj.)
"living on the surface or in the skin of animals," 1832, from epizoon + -ic.
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free-liver (n.)
"one who indulges the appetites," 1711, from free (adj.) + liver (n.2). Related: Free-living.
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