Etymology
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murrain (n.)

early 14c., morein, "disease or plague among people or animals or both," from Anglo-French moryn, Old French moraine "pestilence" (12c.), probably from mourir "to die," from Latin mori "to die," from PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm" (also "to die" and forming words referring to death and to beings subject to death). After c. 1600 used exclusively of domestic animals (especially cattle).

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dado (n.)

1660s, "part of a pedestal between the base and the cornice," from Italian dado "die, cube," from Latin datum (see die (n.)). Meaning "wood paneling on the lower part of a wall in a room" is by 1787.

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moribund (adj.)

1721, "about to die, in a dying state," from French moribund (16c.), from Latin moribundus "dying, at the point of death," from mori "to die," from PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm" (also "to die" and forming words referring to death and to beings subject to death). Figurative sense of "near an end" is from 1837. Related: Moribundity.

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swelter (v.)

c. 1400, "faint with heat," frequentative of swelten "be faint (especially with heat)," late 14c., from Old English sweltan "to die, perish," from Proto-Germanic *swiltan- (source also of Old Saxon sweltan "to die," Old Norse svelta "to put to death, starve," Gothic sviltan "to die"), perhaps originally "to burn slowly," hence "to be overcome with heat or fever," from PIE root *swel- (2) "to shine, beam" (see Selene). From the same ancient root comes Old English swelan "to burn." For specialization of words meaning "to die," compare starve. Related: Sweltered; sweltering.

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convivial (adj.)

1660s, "pertaining to or of the nature of a feast," from Late Latin convivialis "pertaining to a feast," from Latin convivium "a feast," from convivere "to carouse together, live together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + vivere "to live" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live"). Meaning "sociable" is from 18c. Related: Convivially; conviviality.

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liveware (n.)

"people," 1966, computer-programmer jargon, from live (adj.) + ending abstracted from software, etc. Compare old nautical slang live lumber "landsmen on board a ship" (1785).

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converse (v.)

mid-14c., "to move about, live, dwell; live or behave in a certain way" (senses now obsolete), from Old French and French converser "to talk, open communication between," also "to live, dwell, inhabit, reside" (12c.), and directly from Latin conversari "to live, dwell, live with, keep company with," passive voice of conversare, literally "to turn round with," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + versare, frequentative of vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend").

Sense of "to communicate (with)" in English is from 1590s; that of "talk informally with another" is from 1610s. Related: Conversed; conversing.

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expire (v.)

c. 1400, "to die," from Old French expirer "expire, elapse" (12c.), from Latin expirare/exspirare "breathe out, blow out, exhale; breathe one's last, die," hence, figuratively, "expire, come to an end, cease," from ex "out" (see ex-) + spirare "to breathe" (see spirit (n.)). "Die" is the older sense in English; that of "breathe out" is attested from 1580s. Of laws, patents, treaties, etc., mid-15c. In 17c. also transitive. Related: Expired; expiring.

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starve (v.)

Old English steorfan "to die" (past tense stearf, past participle storfen), literally "become stiff," from Proto-Germanic *sterbanan "be stiff, starve" (source also of Old Frisian sterva, Old Saxon sterban, Dutch sterven, Old High German sterban "to die," Old Norse stjarfi "tetanus"), from extended form of PIE root *ster- (1) "stiff."

The conjugation became weak in English by 16c. The sense narrowed to "die of cold" (14c.); transitive meaning "to kill with hunger" is first recorded 1520s (earlier to starve of hunger, early 12c.). Intransitive sense of "to die of hunger" dates from 1570s. German cognate sterben retains the original sense of the word, but the English has come so far from its origins that starve to death (1910) is now common.

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outlive (v.)

"to live longer than," late 15c., from out- + live (v.). Related: Outlived; outliving. Old English had oferbiden (Middle English overbiden, literally "over-bide") for "to outlive, outlast, live through," also oferlibban (literally "over-live;" compare German überleben, Danish overleve). 

Outlive, Survive. Outlive is generally the stronger, carrying something of the idea of surpassing or beating another in vitality or hold upon life; it is tenderer to say that one survives than that he outlives his wife or friend. [Century Dictionary, 1895] 
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