Etymology
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Maecenas 
"a generous patron of literature or the arts," 1560s, from name of Gaius Clinius Maecenas (died 8 B.C.E.), Roman patron of Horace and Virgil.
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post-classical (adj.)

"occurring or written after the times of the Greek or Latin writers considered classical, but before the literature classified as medieval," 1845, from post- + classical.

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romantic (n.)

1827 as "an adherent of romantic virtues in literature," from romantic (adj.). Earlier "a feature suggestive of romance" (1670s).

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dilettante (n.)

1733, "an admirer of a fine art, literature, science, etc., one who cultivates an art or literature casually and for amusement," a borrowing of Italian dilettante "lover of music or painting," from dilettare "to delight," from Latin delectare "to allure, delight, charm, please," frequentative of delicere "entice" (see delicious). Originally without negative connotation, "devoted amateur;" the pejorative sense "superficial and affected dabbler" emerged late 18c. by contrast with professional.

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creative (adj.)

1670s, "having the quality or function of creating," from create + -ive. Of literature and art, "imaginative," from 1816, in Wordsworth. Creative writing is attested by 1848. Related: Creatively.

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parallelism (n.)

c. 1600, " parallel position," from Greek parallelismos, from parallelizein (see parallel). In literature, "correspondence resulting from repetition of the same sentiment, imagery, or construction" is from 1778.

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symbolism (n.)
1650s, "practice of representing things with symbols," from symbol + -ism. Applied to the arts by 1866; attested from 1892 as a movement in French literature, from French symbolisme (see symbolist).
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gradualism (n.)
"a gradual method of action," 1832, in abolitionist literature, as a disparaging term (opposed to immediatism), from gradual + -ism. Related: Gradualist; gradualistic.
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misattribution (n.)

"attribution (of a work of art or literature) to the wrong person," 1865, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + attribution. Related: Misattribute; misattributed; misattributing.

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agitprop (n.)

also agit-prop, "political propaganda in the arts or literature," 1938, from Russian agitatsiya "agitation" (from French agitation; see agitation) + propaganda (see propaganda), which Russian got from German.

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