Etymology
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joie de vivre (n.)
1889, French, literally "joy of living."
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Esmerelda 
fem. proper name, from Spanish, literally "emerald."
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Tuscarora 
Iroquoian people originally inhabiting what is now North Carolina, 1640s, from Catawba (Siouan) /taskarude:/, literally "dry-salt eater," a folk-etymologizing of the people's name for themselves, Tuscarora (Iroquoian) /skaru:re/, literally "hemp-gatherers."
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Macduff 
Gaelic Mac Dhuibh "son of Dubh," literally "black."
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vizier (n.)
also vizir, 1560s, from Turkish vezir "counsellor," from Arabic wazir "viceroy," literally "one who bears (the burden of office)," literally "porter, carrier," from wazara "he carried." But Klein says Arabic wazir is from Avestan viçira "arbitrator, judge." He also says it replaced Arabic katib, literally "writer," in the sense "secretary of state."
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Flaherty 
surname, Irish Flaithbheartach, literally "Bright-Ruler."
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beche-de-mer (n.)
"sea-slug eaten as a delicacy in the Western Pacific," 1814, from French bêche-de-mer, literally "spade of the sea," a folk-etymology alteration of Portuguese bicho do mar "sea-slug," literally "worm of the sea."
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klutz (n.)
1967, American English, from Yiddish klots "clumsy person, blockhead," literally "block, lump," from Middle High German klotz "lump, ball." Compare German klotz "boor, clod," literally "wooden block" (see clot (n.)).
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tic douloureux (n.)
1798, French, literally "painful twitching;" see tic.
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basmati (n.)
"superior variety of rice," 1845, from Hindi, literally "fragrant."
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