Etymology
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bibliotheca (n.)
"the Bible," also "library, place to keep books;" see bibliothec.
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card-catalogue (n.)

"catalogue of a library in which entries are made on separate cards arranged in order in boxes or drawers," 1853, in the regulations of the Boston public library, from card (n.1) + catalogue (n.).

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de-accession (v.)

also deaccession, "remove an entry for an item from the register of a museum, library, etc." (often a euphemism for "to sell"), by 1968, from de- "off, away" + accession, which had been used since 1887 in library publications as a verb meaning "to add to a catalogue." Related: De-accessioned; de-accessioning.

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Bodleian 
from Sir Thomas Bodley (1545-1613), who in 1597 refounded the library at Oxford University.
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overdue (adj.)

"delayed or withheld beyond the usual or assigned time," 1845 of unpaid bills, 1890 of unreturned library books, 1970 of menstruation, from over- + due (adj.).

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Harleian (adj.)
1744, from Latinized form of surname of Robert Harley, Earl of Oxford (1661-1724) and his son Edward, in reference to the library of several thousand books and MSS they collected and sold in 1753 to the British Museum.
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Ambrose 
masc. proper name, from Latin Ambrosius, from Greek ambrosios "immortal, belonging to the immortals" (see ambrosia). The Ambrosian Library in Milan, founded 1609 by Cardinal Borromeo, is named for Saint Ambrose (obit 397), bishop of Milan.
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museum (n.)

1610s, "the university building in Alexandria," from Latin museum "library, study," from Greek mouseion "place of study, library or museum, school of art or poetry," originally "a temple or shrine of the Muses," from Mousa "Muse" (see muse (n.)). The earliest use in reference to English institutions was of libraries for scholarly study (1640s); the sense of "building or part of a building set aside as a repository and display place for objects relating to art, literature, or science" is recorded by 1680s.

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non-renewable (adj.)

also nonrenewable, "not able to be renewed," by 1896 of licenses, library book loans, etc., from non- + renewable. Of natural resources or sources of energy, "existing in finite quantity; not capable of being replenished," by 1935. 

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non-fiction (adj.)

also nonfiction, of prose writing or books, "telling of facts, real events, and real people," 1866, a librarians' word, first in the reports of the Boston Public Library, from non- + fiction. Apparently not in widespread use until after 1900.

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