Etymology
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cloudlet (n.)

"a small cloud," 1788, from cloud (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

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boomlet (n.)
"small burst of activity, prosperity, etc.," 1880, from boom (n.3) + -let.
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booklet (n.)
"a small book," 1859, from book (n.) + diminutive ending -let.
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anklet (n.)
"ornamental ring for an ankle," 1810, from ankle, with diminutive suffix -let, after bracelet, etc.
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droplet (n.)

"a little drop," c. 1600, from drop (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

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driblet (n.)

also dribblet, "small piece or part, an inconsiderable part of a whole," 1590s, diminutive of drib (n.) with -let.

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platelet (n.)

"a little plate," originally and especially of the disk-shaped corpuscles in mammalian blood, 1895, formed in English from plate (n.) + diminutive suffix -let.

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piglet (n.)

"a small or young pig," 1883, from pig (n.1) + diminutive suffix -let. Earlier name for baby pig was farrow.

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ringlet (n.)

1550s, "circlet, ring other than a finger ring," from ring (n.1) + diminutive suffix -let. As "a curl of hair," usually a long and spiraled lock, by 1660s. Related: Ringleted.

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leet (n.1)
in reference to special court proceedings, late 13c., from Anglo-French lete, Anglo-Latin leta, of unknown origin; OED suggests possible connection to let (v.).
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