Etymology
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let-up (n.)
"cessation, restraint, relaxation, intermission," 1837, from verbal phrase let up "cease, stop" (1787). In Old English the phrase meant "to put ashore" (let out meant "put to sea"). Bartlett (1848) says the noun is "an expression borrowed from pugilists."
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in-flight (adj.)
also inflight, "during or within a flight," 1945, from in (prep.) + flight.
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in situ 
1740, Latin, literally "in its (original) place or position," from ablative of situs "site" (see site (n.)).
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in-store (adj.)
also instore, 1954, from in (prep.) + store (n.). In Middle English, instore was a verb meaning "to restore, renew," from Latin instaurare.
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shoo-in (n.)
"easy winner" (especially in politics), 1939, from earlier sense "horse that wins a race by pre-arrangement" (1928); the verb phrase shoo in in this sense is from 1908; from shoo (v.) + in (adv.).
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trade-in (n.)
1917, in reference to used cars, from verbal phrase, from trade (v.) + in (adv.).
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in-patient (n.)
also inpatient, "person lodged and fed, as well as treated, at a hospital or infirmary," 1760, from in (adj.) + patient (n.). As an adjective by 1890.
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in-itselfness (n.)
1879, in philosophy; see in (adv.) + itself + -ness.
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in toto (adv.)
Latin, "as a whole, wholly, completely, utterly, entirely," from toto, ablative of totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)); "always or nearly always with verbs of negative sense" [Fowler].
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plug-in (adj.)

"designed to be plugged into a socket," 1922, from the verbal phrase, from plug (v.) + in (adv.).

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