Etymology
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time-server (n.)
"one who adapts his manners and opinions to the times," 1580s, from expression serve the time "shape one's views to what is in favor" (1550s), translating Latin tempori servire. See time (n.) + serve (v.).
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big time (n.)
"upper reaches of a profession or pursuit," by 1909 in vaudeville slang. As an adjective by 1915. The same phrase was common in colloquial use late 19c.-early 20c. in a broad range of senses: "party, shindig, fun, frolic."
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full-time (adj.)
also fulltime, 1895; full-timer is attested from 1855, in reference to students; see full (adj.) + time (n.).
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time-keeper (n.)
also timekeeper, 1680s, from time (n.) + keeper.
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two-time (v.)
"to deceive, cheat, betray," 1924, perhaps from notion of "to have two at a time." An earlier reference (1922) in a Kentucky criminal case involves a double-cross or betrayal without a romance angle. Related: two-timing (adj.); two-timer.
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half-time (n.)
also halftime, half time, indicating "half of the time," 1640s, from half + time (n.). Tempo sense is by 1880. In football, from 1867.
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all-time (adj.)
"during recorded time," 1910, American English, from all + time (n.). Earlier it had been used in a sense "full-time," of employment, or in opposition to one-time (1883). Middle English had al-time (adv.) "at all times, always; all the time" (c. 1400).
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old-time (adj.)

"of long standing; having the characteristics of former times," 1824, from old + time (n.). Related: Old-timey (1850). Old times "olden days" is from late 14c. Colloquial old-timer "one who has long occupied a given place or condition; one who retains the views and customs of former times" is by 1860.

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war-time (n.)
late 14c., from war (n.) + time (n.).
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night-time (n.)

also nighttime, "the hours of darkness," late 13c., from night + time (n.). In the same sense Middle English had also nighter-tale (c. 1300), probably based on Old Norse nattar-þel.

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