Etymology
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leftward (adv.)
"to or toward the left or the left-hand side," late 15c., from left (adj.) + -ward. Related: Leftwards.
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levulose (n.)

old name of the sugar isomeric with dextrose but distinguished from it by turning the plane of polarization to the left, 1865 (1864 in German) from Latin laevus "left" (from PIE *laiwo- "left;" see left (adj.)) + sugar ending -ose (2). 

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Indus 

river in Asia, from Sanskrit sindhu "river." The constellation was one of the 11 added to Ptolemy's list in the 1610s by Flemish cartographer Petrus Plancius (1552-1622) after Europeans began to explore the Southern Hemisphere; it represents "an Indian," not the river.

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sinistral (adj.)

late 15c., "unlucky," from Old French senestral, sinistral or Medieval Latin *sinistralis, from Latin sinister "left, on the left side" (see sinister). Meaning "on the left side" is from 1803. Related: Sinistrally.

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remanent (adj.)

early 15c., "remaining, left over; left behind, remaining, continuing, staying," senses now obsolete, from Old French remanant, remenant, present-participle of remanoir "to stay; be left," and directly from Latin remanentem (nominative remanens), present participle of remanere "stay behind; be left behind" (see remain (v.), and compare remnant, which is a syncopated version of this word). In physics by 1866, probably from Latin.

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lefty (n.)
"left-handed person," 1886, American English, baseball slang, from left (adj.) + -y (3). Political sense by 1935.
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leftist (adj.)
1897, from left in the political sense + -ist.
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antichthon (n.)

c. 1600, antichthones (plural), from Latin antichthontes, from Greek antikhthōntēs "people of the opposite hemisphere," from anti "opposite" (see anti-) + khthōn "land, earth, soil" (from PIE root *dhghem- "earth"). In Pythagorean philosophy, an imagined invisible double of earth.

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leftover (adj.)
also left-over, "remaining, not used up," 1890, from left + over. The noun meaning "something left over" is from 1891; leftovers "excess food after a meal" (especially if re-served later) is from 1878; in this sense Old English had metelaf.
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sinister (adj.)
Origin and meaning of sinister
early 15c., "prompted by malice or ill-will, intending to mislead," from Old French senestre, sinistre "contrary, false; unfavorable; to the left" (14c.), from Latin sinister "left, on the left side" (opposite of dexter), of uncertain origin. Perhaps meaning properly "the slower or weaker hand" [Tucker], but Klein and Buck suggest it's a euphemism (see left (adj.)) connected with the root of Sanskrit saniyan "more useful, more advantageous." With contrastive or comparative suffix -ter, as in dexter (see dexterity).

The Latin word was used in augury in the sense of "unlucky, unfavorable" (omens, especially bird flights, seen on the left hand were regarded as portending misfortune), and thus sinister acquired a sense of "harmful, unfavorable, adverse." This was from Greek influence, reflecting the early Greek practice of facing north when observing omens. In genuine Roman auspices, the augurs faced south and left was favorable. Thus sinister also retained a secondary sense in Latin of "favorable, auspicious, fortunate, lucky."

Meaning "evil" is from late 15c. Used in heraldry from 1560s to indicate "left, to the left." Bend (not "bar") sinister in heraldry indicates illegitimacy and preserves the literal sense of "on or from the left side" (though in heraldry this is from the view of the bearer of the shield, not the observer of it; see bend (n.2)).
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