Etymology
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functionary (n.)

"one who has a certain function, one who holds an office," 1791, from or patterned on French fonctionnaire, a word of the Revolution; from fonction (see function (n.)). As an adjective in English from 1822, "functional." Related: Functionarism.

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prepositional (adj.)

"pertaining to or having the nature or function of a preposition," 1754, from preposition + -al (1). Related: Prepositionally.

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procreative (adj.)

"having the power or function of begetting," 1630s; see procreate + -ive. Related: Procreativeness.

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inspectorate (n.)

1762, "function or office of an inspector," from inspector + -ate (1). From 1853 as "district under the supervision of an inspector."

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secretory (adj.)

"of or pertaining to secretion, having the function of secreting," 1690s; see secrete (v.1) + -ory.

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biorhythm (n.)

also bio-rhythm, "cyclic variation in some bodily function," 1960, from bio- + rhythm. Related: Biorhythmic.

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hegemony (n.)

1560s, "preponderance, dominance, leadership," originally of predominance of one city state or another in Greek history; from Greek hēgemonia "leadership, a leading the way, a going first;" also "the authority or sovereignty of one city-state over a number of others," as Athens in Attica, Thebes in Boeotia; from hēgemon "leader, an authority, commander, sovereign," from hēgeisthai "to lead," perhaps originally "to track down," from PIE *sag-eyo-, from root *sag- "to seek out, track down, trace" (see seek). In reference to modern situations from 1850, at first of Prussia in relation to other German states.

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authorship (n.)

c. 1500, "the function of being a writer," from author (n.) + -ship. The meaning "literary origination, source of something that has an author" is attested by 1808.

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clerkship (n.)

late 15c., "state of being in holy orders," from clerk (n.) + -ship. From 1540s as "function or business of an office clerk."

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occlusive (adj.)

"serving to close, having the function of closing," 1867, from Latin occlus-, past-participle stem of occludere (see occlude) + -ive.

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